Solicitor General Inveighs Against Antitrust-Law Revolution in SCOTUS “Apple v. Pepper” Amicus Brief

app storeEd. Note: With this post we welcome WLF’s newest attorney, Corbin K. Barthold, as a WLF Legal Pulse author.

Many legal disputes pit the affective and sometimes utopian thinking of lawyers against the statistical and efficiency-oriented thinking of economists. The archetypal lawyer subscribes to the maxim ubi jus ibi remedium—“where there is a right, there is a remedy.” The archetypal economist is more likely to agree with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.’s view that “such words as ‘right’ are a constant solicitation to fallacy.”

In antitrust cases, at least, the Supreme Court often sides with the economists. Illinois Brick Co. v. Illinois, 431 U.S. 720 (1977), is a good example. It says that only the direct purchaser of an abusive monopolist’s goods or services may sue the monopolist for violating the antitrust laws. Someone who buys a product only indirectly—someone who, say, buys from a retailer who buys from an antitrust-law-violating manufacturer—is out of luck. She may not sue even if the retailer incorporated some of the supracompetitive wholesale price into the retail price. It would be too difficult, Illinois Brick concludes, to accurately apportion damages among distributers, retailers, and consumers. Continue reading “Solicitor General Inveighs Against Antitrust-Law Revolution in SCOTUS “Apple v. Pepper” Amicus Brief”

Status Quo at the PTO: High Court Preserves Inter Partes Review

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor, Intellectual Property—Patents

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Venable LLP

Inter Partes Review (“IPR”) lives to see another day (or challenge). On April 24, 2018, the Supreme Court issued its opinion in Oil States Energy Services, LLC v. Greene’s Energy Group, LLC, which could have wholly invalidated the IPR process used by the Patent and Trademark Office (“PTO”) to scrutinize the validity of already-issued patents. Though not the first constitutional challenge to IPR, Oil States marks the first time the Supreme Court has confronted the issue head-on since IPR came into existence five years ago. Continue reading “Status Quo at the PTO: High Court Preserves Inter Partes Review”

Supreme Court Continues to Nibble Away at Alien Tort Statute’s Sweep

supreme courtYesterday’s decision in Jesner v. Arab Bank, PLC, the U.S. Supreme Court’s third major decision involving the Alien Tort Statute (ATS), continues a trend of reining in human rights activists’ efforts to police private businesses’ overseas conduct through ATS litigation.  The Court held that foreign corporations may not be sued under the ATS for their overseas conduct.  But as with past Supreme Court ATS decisions, the justices once again failed to shut the door entirely on human rights activists: the ruling said nothing about the many ATS claims pending against American corporations.  It thereby ensured that U.S. companies will continue to face such claims for the foreseeable future.

While Jesner suggests that five justices likely would rule that the federal courts should not recognize an ATS cause of action against American corporations for their overseas activities, several federal appeals courts have exhibited little willingness to limit the scope of ATS liability unless directly ordered to do so by the Supreme Court. Continue reading “Supreme Court Continues to Nibble Away at Alien Tort Statute’s Sweep”

Supreme Court Has Second Chance to Resolve Circuit Split on Two Criminal Securities Fraud Issues

SchaerrGuest Commentary

By Gene C. Schaerr, a Partner with Schaerr Duncan LLP in Washington, DC. Mr. Schaerr is Counsel of Record for the petitioners on the certiorari petition discussed here.

The U.S. Supreme Court may be about to resolve two issues of enormous importance to anyone involved, directly or indirectly, in the sale of securities.  The case that may provide the vehicle for such a ruling, Ellison v. United States, was recently the subject of an order directing the U.S. Solicitor General to file a response to the defendants’ petition for certiorari by May 21.  That petition challenges a U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit decision that, as the Cato Institute, Reason Foundation, and a group of law professors explained in a supporting amicus brief, exacerbates a “system” already “stacked in favor of the government.” Continue reading “Supreme Court Has Second Chance to Resolve Circuit Split on Two Criminal Securities Fraud Issues”

“China Agritech” SCOTUS Case Will Turn on Justices’ Opinions of Class Actions

supreme courtDuring oral arguments this coming Monday in China Agritech, Inc. v. Resh (click here for WLF’s amicus brief) the U.S. Supreme Court ostensibly will be considering a technical issue regarding statutes of limitations: when should the doctrine of “equitable tolling” be applied to extend the deadline for filing a class action lawsuit? But how the justices determine the scope of that judge-made doctrine has little to do with applying well-established equitable doctrines in this area of the law (there aren’t any) and everything to do with how warmly they feel about class litigation as a vehicle for providing effective relief for large numbers of plaintiffs with small claims. The evidence suggests that the Court is far less enamored with class actions than it once was and will use China Agritech to cut back on their use. Continue reading ““China Agritech” SCOTUS Case Will Turn on Justices’ Opinions of Class Actions”

District Courts Divide over Application of “Bristol-Myers Squibb” Decision to Class Actions

troyer_brian_240x470Guest Commentary

By Brian A. Troyer, a Partner with Thompson Hine LLP in its Cleveland, OH office.

In a September 8, 2017 Washington Legal Foundation Legal Backgrounder on Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court of California, 137 S. Ct. 1773 (2017), I noted that it would remain to be determined how courts would apply it to nationwide and multistate class actions. An Illinois federal court recently became the latest to confront this issue, holding that it lacked jurisdiction over the defendant with respect to claims of nonresident class members, disagreeing with courts in California and Louisiana. The result is a clear split among district courts on the question, and the issue is likely to be brought to the U.S. Supreme Court if courts of appeal also reach opposite conclusions on such a fundamental question. Continue reading “District Courts Divide over Application of “Bristol-Myers Squibb” Decision to Class Actions”

DOJ Memo and Court Opinion Show Trend in Damming Flood of False Claims Act Suits

11th CircuitBusinesses that routinely contract with the government know that while the relationship comes with high financial rewards, it also can expose those companies to massive civil liability.  Under the False Claims Act (FCA), government contractors can find themselves sued for hundreds of millions of dollars based on mere technical violations of complex regulatory schemes.

Luckily, as highlighted in several of our previous posts, the U.S. Supreme Court has recently reinforced the high evidentiary threshold FCA plaintiffs need to meet to bring a successful claim under the most common theory of FCA liability.  A recently disclosed U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) memo and a recent opinion from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit might similarly lead to fewer baseless claims against government contractors. Continue reading “DOJ Memo and Court Opinion Show Trend in Damming Flood of False Claims Act Suits”