“U.S. v. Martoma”: Second Circuit’s Latest, but Perhaps not Last, Word on Insider-Trading Tippee Liability

Featured Expert Contributor, Corporate Governance/Securities Law

bainbridgeStephen M. Bainbridge, William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law.

Matthew Martoma was a portfolio manager at S.A.C. Capital Advisors, LLC, a hedge fund owned and managed by Steven A. Cohen, which had been the subject of numerous insider trading investigations. One of those investigations resulted in Martoma being charged with insider trading on the stocks of a pair of drug companies developing a new Alzheimer’s disease drug treatment. Martoma had received tips of material nonpublic information about the treatment from two drug company employees. Martoma was convicted and appealed.

In a 2-1 opinion by Chief Judge Katzmann, the Second Circuit affirmed Martoma’s conviction. Its decision in United States v. Martoma is the first major interpretation of the Supreme Court’s decision in Salman v. United States, and the first effort to determine the remaining scope, if any, of the Second Circuit’s 2014 decision in United States v. Newman. Continue reading ““U.S. v. Martoma”: Second Circuit’s Latest, but Perhaps not Last, Word on Insider-Trading Tippee Liability”

Will “Kokesh v. SEC” Put a Kink in the Federal Trade Commission’s Disgorgement Hose?

Featured Expert Column: Antitrust & Competition Policy — Federal Trade Commission

06633 - Royall, M. Sean ( Dallas )By M. Sean Royall, a Partner with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, with Richard H. Cunningham, Of Counsel in the firm’s Denver, CO office.*

Ed. Note: This is Mr. Royall’s debut column as the WLF Legal Pulse‘s new Antitrust & Competition Policy, FTC “Featured Expert Contributor.” WLF recognizes and appreciates former FTC Featured Expert Contributor Andrea Murino‘s four years of serving in that pro bono position.

On June 5th, 2017, the Supreme Court held in Kokesh v. SEC that disgorgement is a “penalty” subject to a five-year statute of limitations under 28 U.S.C. § 2462.  With that ruling, the Court explicitly rejected the long-standing assertion of the Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) that it possesses authority to reach back indefinitely when seeking the disgorgement of ill-gotten gains.  While the Kokesh opinion explicitly limits its holding to disgorgement “as it is applied in SEC enforcement proceedings,”1 the Court’s logic extends to disgorgement actions brought by other agencies proceeding under analogous statutory authority, including the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Continue reading “Will “Kokesh v. SEC” Put a Kink in the Federal Trade Commission’s Disgorgement Hose?”

“Kokesh v. SEC”: Its Wide-Ranging (and Mostly Good) Implications for Disgorgement Actions

MorrisGuest Commentary

By Andrew J. Morris, a Partner with Morvillo LLP. Mr. Morris authored a March 10, 2017 WLF Legal BackgrounderIs the Clock Running out on SEC’s Unchecked Pursuit of Disgorgement Penalties?

In Kokesh v. Securities and Exchange Commission, the US Supreme Court ruled that SEC actions for disgorgement are governed by the five-year statute of limitations for penalties. This decision is a real blow to the SEC: It ends the practice of using disgorgement actions to obtain massive sanctions for conduct that took place many years in the past, outside the limitations period for penalties and forfeitures. The decision also invites defendants to make further challenges to SEC enforcement actions by litigating several related issues.

Implications for Enforcement Proceedings

The Court’s opinion, written by Justice Sotomayor, is summarized in a WLF Legal Pulse post authored last week by UCLA School of Law Professor Stephen Bainbridge. The gist of the decision is that disgorgement is a form of penalty because it involves a defendant who has violated a public law and must pay money to the United States Treasury; this contrasts with non-penalty cases, where the defendant has injured a particular victim and must pay compensation to that victim. And because disgorgement is a penalty, the Supreme Court held, disgorgement actions are covered by 28 U.S.C. § 2462, the five-year statute of limitations for penalties. Continue reading ““Kokesh v. SEC”: Its Wide-Ranging (and Mostly Good) Implications for Disgorgement Actions”

Supreme Court Observations: Kokesh v. Securities & Exchange Commission

Featured Expert Contributor – Corporate Governance/Securities Law

bainbridgeStephen M. Bainbridge, William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law.

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) can seek a wide range of sanctions against those who violate the federal securities laws, including various monetary penalties. Most of these causes of action are subject to the 5 year statutes of limitations under 28 U.S.C. § 2462. Section 2462 applies to any “action, suit or proceeding for the enforcement of any civil fine, penalty, or forfeiture.” In Gabelli v. SEC, 568 U. S. 442 (2013), the US Supreme Court held that suits in which SEC seeks monetary civil penalties are subject to § 2462. Until recently, however, SEC claimed—and some lower courts agreed—that actions for disgorgement were not subject to § 2462 or, for that matter, any other statute of limitations.

In a unanimous June 5, 2017, opinion by Justice Sotomayor, however, the Supreme Court held that disgorgement imposed in SEC actions constitutes a penalty and, accordingly, that such suits are subject to the § 2462 limitations period. Kokesh v. SEC, 581 U.S. ___ (2017). [Editor’s Note: Washington Legal Foundation filed an amicus brief in the Court in support of the Petitioner]. Continue reading “Supreme Court Observations: Kokesh v. Securities & Exchange Commission”

One Loss before ALJ Doesn’t Unmake SEC’s Home-Court Advantage

Corporate Governance/Securities Law

bainbridgeStephen M. Bainbridge, William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law.

Las Vegas odds makers say that having the home field is worth about three points to the average National Football League team, which is helpful but not a guarantee of victory. For some teams, however, the home-field advantage gives them an almost insurmountable edge. Between 2012 and 2015, for example, the Seattle Seahawks won 27 out of 32 home games and all four of their home playoff games. During that period, no other NFL team had a bigger home-field advantage.

Despite the huge advantage playing at home gave the Seahawks, it didn’t make them unbeatable. After all, they did lose five out of those 36 games. All of which is why the press hullaballoo over a Securities and Exchange Commission administrative law judge’s (ALJ) decision in In re Hill1 is much overblown. Continue reading “One Loss before ALJ Doesn’t Unmake SEC’s Home-Court Advantage”

Outcome of Recently Argued “Kokesh” SCOTUS Case Will Impact SEC’s Use of Potent Disgorgement Authority

Featured Expert Contributor — Corporate Governance/Securities Law

bainbridgeStephen M. Bainbridge, William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law.

Disgorgement of ill-gotten gains long has been a basic tool in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) penalty toolkit, despite a paucity of statutory authorization.1 The equitable nature of disgorgement has meant courts have had to resolve many questions without the benefit of statutory guidance. In Kokesh v. SEC,2 the US Supreme Court took up the seemingly technical—but surprisingly important—question of what statute of limitations applies to SEC disgorgement actions.

Appellant Charles Kokesh owned and controlled a pair of investment adviser firms that, in turn, managed four business development corporations (BDCs). Both the investment advisers and the BDCs were registered with SEC. SEC alleged that Kokesh misappropriated almost $35  million from the BDCs for the benefit of himself and the investment adviser firms. After a civil trial, a jury agreed that Kokesh had fraudulently misappropriated the funds. The trial judge ordered Kokesh to disgorge $34.9 million, which it found “reasonably approximates the ill-gotten gains causally connected to Defendant’s violations.” Continue reading “Outcome of Recently Argued “Kokesh” SCOTUS Case Will Impact SEC’s Use of Potent Disgorgement Authority”

Change Coming for SEC’s Controversial Conflict Minerals Rule

Featured Expert Contributor — Corporate Governance/Securities Law

bainbridgeStephen M. Bainbridge, William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law.

Section 1502 of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act required the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to develop disclosure rules requiring public companies to disclose whether their products contained “conflict minerals.” The minerals in question included cassiterite, columbite-tantalite, gold, wolframite, or their derivatives, all of which are used in a variety of common products, including computers, smart phones, and other everyday technology. In order to be deemed conflict minerals, they had to be sourced from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) or its adjoining countries. Continue reading “Change Coming for SEC’s Controversial Conflict Minerals Rule”