FEDERAL REGULATORY READING LIST: Resources for New Leaders at DOJ

DOJ*Note: This is the third in a series of posts compiling Washington Legal Foundation papers, briefs, regulatory comments, and blog commentaries relevant to critical legal and constitutional issues facing new senior leaders at specific federal regulatory agencies. To read posts addressing other federal agencies, click here.

As the federal government’s primary prosecutor, the Department of Justice (DOJ) serves an important role in enforcing criminal penalties.  However, DOJ frequently oversteps its bounds and advances overzealous enforcement policies.

Through its public-interest litigation, publishing, and other advocacy, WLF influenced debates over DOJ’s recent policies and actions with timely papers and blog commentaries, and weighed in directly through amicus briefs.  Those activities have resulted in an impressive body of reference materials that are instructive for new leadership in the agency.  This post provides a summary of and links to those documents below to simplify access to relevant work product from WLF in each of those areas.

Overcriminalization Timeline

In November 2015, WLF released the third edition of its Timeline: Federal Erosion of Business Civil Liberties (Overcriminalization Timeline).  Each category in the Timeline reflects a separate concern with DOJ’s approach to white-collar criminal enforcement: mens rea, DOJ criminal enforcement, attorney-client and work product privileges, deferred prosecution and non-prosecution agreements, and criminal sentencing. Continue reading

FEDERAL REGULATORY READING LIST: Resources for New Leaders at FCC

FCC*Note: This is the second in a planned series of posts compiling Washington Legal Foundation papers, briefs, regulatory comments, and blog commentaries relevant to critical legal and constitutional issues facing new senior leaders at specific federal regulatory agencies. To see the first post in the series, discussing DOL, OSHA, EEOC, and NLRB, click here.

Rapid technological change has altered the way people communicate and consume information.  For the past eight years, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been scrambling to adapt to this new reality while expanding its regulatory turf.  In the process, FCC has cut corners and imposed new regulations that chill innovation and investment.

Through its public-interest litigation, publishing, and other advocacy, WLF influenced debates over FCC’s policies and actions with timely papers and blog commentaries, and weighed in directly through regulatory comments and amicus briefs.  Those activities have resulted in an impressive body of reference materials that are instructive for new leadership in the agency.  We provide a summary of and links to those documents below to simplify access to relevant work product from WLF in each of those areas. Continue reading

FEDERAL REGULATORY READING LIST: Resources for New Employment and Workplace Agency Leaders

*Note: This is the first in a planned series of  posts compiling Washington Legal Foundation papers, briefs, regulatory comments, and blog commentaries relevant to critical legal and constitutional issues facing new senior leaders at specific federal regulatory agencies.

For the past eight years, employers have faced a dizzying array of new employment and workplace-safety regulations, guidance documents, and enforcement policies from the Department of Labor (DOL), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), and the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). Some of those new rules and directives departed dramatically from decades-old agency policies and practices.

Through its public-interest litigating, publishing, and communications capabilities, WLF influenced debates over those agencies’ policies and actions with timely papers and blog commentaries, and weighed in directly through regulatory comments and amicus briefs.  Those activities have resulted in an impressive body of reference materials that are instructive for new leadership in those agencies.  We provide a summary of and links to those documents below to simplify access to relevant work product from WLF in each of those areas. Continue reading