Noel Canning: A Triumph of Judicial Restraint Over Originalism

noelIn its late June decision in NLRB v. Noel Canning, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously invalidated President Obama’s efforts to make three recess appointments to the National Labor Relations Board.  The Court was sharply divided, however, on the rationale for its decision.  Five justices joined Justice Breyer’s majority opinion, which rejected the most sweeping challenges to the recess appointments and ruled against the Administration on the much narrower ground that the Senate was not, in fact, in recess at the time that the appointments were made.  As a long-time advocate of judicial restraint, I applaud the narrow approach adopted by Justice Breyer.  Justice Scalia’s opinion concurring only in the judgment would have had the effect of preventing future Presidents from making recess appointments except in the rarest of circumstances.  To me, it illustrates the shortcomings of originalism as a means of ensuring judicial restraint.

Article II of the Constitution mandates that the President ordinarily must obtain “the Advice and Consent of the Senate” before appointing an officer of the United States.  The Recess Appointments Clause creates a limited exception to that requirement by authorizing the President, on a temporary basis, “to fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate.”  Noel Canning forced the Court to construe the meaning of two phrases contained in the clause.

First, what is meant by “the Recess of the Senate?”  Those challenging the NLRB appointments claimed that the phrase refers only to an inter-session recess, i.e., a break between formal sessions of Congress.  On the other hand, President Obama asserted (as have all recent Presidents) that the phrase also encompasses an intra-session recess, such as a summer recess in the midst of a session.  The NLRB appointments would have been improper under the challengers’ interpretation because the Senate indisputably was not on an inter-session recess at the time of the appointments.

Second, what is the scope of the phrase “Vacancies that may happen?”  The challengers asserted that the phrase refers only to vacancies that first come into existence during a recess.  President Obama (and his predecessors dating back for at least a century) urged a broader reading that would also encompass vacancies that arise prior to a recess but continue to exist during that recess.  The NLRB appointments would have been improper under the challengers’ interpretation because they were made to fill offices that first became vacant before the start of the recess in question.

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