Will a SCOTUS Grant in Berkheimer v. HP Finally Get Alice Out of Wonderland?

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor, Intellectual Property—Patents

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Venable LLP

The future of patent-infringement challenges under 35 U.S.C. § 101 may be in the hands of the Solicitor General of the United States. The defendant in Berkheimer v. Hewlett Packard petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to grant certiorari and overturn a U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit decision that applied the high court’s Alice Corporation v. CLS Bank International decision. Hewlett Packard petitioned after the Federal Circuit denied rehearing en banc, a denial that included an exasperated concurrence by two judges seeking further guidance on how the court should interpret Alice. On January 7, the Supreme Court requested the views of the Solicitor General. Continue reading “Will a SCOTUS Grant in Berkheimer v. HP Finally Get Alice Out of Wonderland?”

Still Marching to its Own Drummer: The Eastern District of Texas on Patent Venue

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor, Intellectual Property—Patents

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Venable LLP

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit’s interpretation of the patent venue statute, 35 U.S.C. § 1400(b), as articulated in TC Heartland LLC v. Kraft Foods Group Brands LLC, has created a degree of uncertainty about the proper place to bring patent infringement suits. For example, see our previous posts on this issue: Supreme Court Alters Patent Venue Landscape: Eastern District Texas No Longer the Heartland of Patent Litigation; and Change in Law of Patent Venue May Not Be Get Out of Texas Card.

In Seven Networks v. Google, Eastern District of Texas Judge Rodney Gilstrap provided direction for litigants bringing or defending suits in venues in which they are not incorporated. Prior to TC Heartland, courts interpreted the patent venue statute broadly and generally allowed suits to be brought in any venue where an allegedly infringing device was sold. After TC Heartland, the venue paradigm has been less clear. Continue reading “Still Marching to its Own Drummer: The Eastern District of Texas on Patent Venue”