Corrosive Legal Uncertainty Remains after DC Circuit’s Rehearing Denial in “Net Neutrality” Case

RothGuest Commentary

By Arielle Roth, The Hudson Institute*

It came as no surprise last week when the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit denied the request for en banc rehearing in US Telecom v. FCC, better known as the “net neutrality” case.  As a technical matter, the panel decision upheld the Federal Communication Commission’s 2015 Title II order, which reclassified broadband Internet as a “telecommunications service” and in turn subjected broadband providers to common carriage regulation. Such a grant would have been rare in any event. Further, in the view of Judge Sri Srinivasan’s opinion concurring in the denial of rehearing, the issues were unfit for judicial review in light of the announcement by current FCC Chairman Ajit Pai of a rulemaking to reverse the previous FCC’s order.

On the contrary, it is precisely because the current FCC seeks to undo the rules in question that the DC Circuit ought to have granted en banc rehearing. Continue reading “Corrosive Legal Uncertainty Remains after DC Circuit’s Rehearing Denial in “Net Neutrality” Case”

What Does Nullifying FCC’s Broadband Privacy Rules Mean for Consumers?

FCCPresident Trump signed a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution on April 3, 2017 that nullified the Federal Communication Commission’s (FCC) privacy rule aimed at Internet Service Providers (ISPs).  As discussed in the WLF Legal Pulse’s reading list for FCC regulators last month, the Commission adopted the rule just before the 2016 election over the opposition of two Commissioners (including one who has since become FCC Chairman).  WLF filed comments last May opposing the proposed rule.  Many media commentators and self-styled consumer advocates proclaimed that the proverbial sky was falling due to the nullification.  Such ideologically-fueled Chicken-Little rhetoric, however, does not reflect reality.

Post-nullification analyses bemoaned ISPs’ collection of consumers’ “personal information” and the ability of these companies to sell such information to expand their businesses.  Nay-sayers’ complaints essentially boiled down to the bromide offered in the Washington Post:  the CRA resolution “wipe[d] away landmark privacy protections for Internet users.” Continue reading “What Does Nullifying FCC’s Broadband Privacy Rules Mean for Consumers?”

FEDERAL REGULATORY READING LIST: Resources for New Leaders at FCC

FCC*Note: This is the second in a planned series of posts compiling Washington Legal Foundation papers, briefs, regulatory comments, and blog commentaries relevant to critical legal and constitutional issues facing new senior leaders at specific federal regulatory agencies. To see the first post in the series, discussing DOL, OSHA, EEOC, and NLRB, click here.

Rapid technological change has altered the way people communicate and consume information.  For the past eight years, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been scrambling to adapt to this new reality while expanding its regulatory turf.  In the process, FCC has cut corners and imposed new regulations that chill innovation and investment.

Through its public-interest litigation, publishing, and other advocacy, WLF influenced debates over FCC’s policies and actions with timely papers and blog commentaries, and weighed in directly through regulatory comments and amicus briefs.  Those activities have resulted in an impressive body of reference materials that are instructive for new leadership in the agency.  We provide a summary of and links to those documents below to simplify access to relevant work product from WLF in each of those areas. Continue reading “FEDERAL REGULATORY READING LIST: Resources for New Leaders at FCC”

A Q&A with Federal Regulation Scholar Susan Dudley on Reconsidering Regulations

dudleysusan-2015_crop_webSusan E. Dudley is Director of the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center, which she founded in 2009, and a distinguished professor of practice in the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration. From 2007 to 2009, she served as the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

WLF Legal Pulse: As promised, Congress and the Administration have quickly gotten to work reconsidering and removing a host of federal regulations while also setting the stage for a much different approach to regulation.  Let’s first talk about what Congress is doing.

Professor Dudley: Under the Congressional Review Act of 1996 (CRA), Congress has 60 legislative days after a regulation is published to vote to disapprove it.  The procedures for disapproval are streamlined (including requiring a simple majority in the Senate) and if a rule is disapproved, the agency cannot issue something substantially similar. Continue reading “A Q&A with Federal Regulation Scholar Susan Dudley on Reconsidering Regulations”

Telecom Regulation Experts Question FCC’s Conformity to Law, Constitution at WLF Briefing

FCCGuest Commentary

By Grace Galvin, Washington Legal Foundation*

Technology is constantly changing, and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), like everyone else, feels the need to keep up with the times. The agency’s recent efforts to maintain its role as the core regulator of the communications sector, however, has gotten it into a bit of trouble.

Washington Legal Foundation brought a panel of experts together on October 20, 2016, including FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai, former FCC Commissioner Harold Furchtgott-Roth, and administrative law attorney Brett Shumate of the Wiley Rein LLP, to discuss FCC’s increasing tendency to overreach the limits placed on it by the federal Telecommunication Act and the US Constitution.

Commissioner Pai looked back on recent years and said FCC has gotten into trouble with the courts “by forging ahead with what it considered to be good policy, regardless of legal consequences.” Federal circuit courts outside of D.C. have been quick to admonish the FCC for overstepping its statutory and constitutional boundaries. Continue reading “Telecom Regulation Experts Question FCC’s Conformity to Law, Constitution at WLF Briefing”

Friday Finger on the Pulse: From Our Blogroll and Beyond

  • FCC privacy rule frowns upon arbitration, announces forthcoming rule to ban its use in Internet service provider-customer privacy disputes (Truth on the Market)
  • Five takeaways from influential Duke Law Center for Judicial Studies conference on settlement of class actions (Class Action Countermeasures)
  • DOJ’s settlement of two False Claims Act suits indicate impacts of Yates Memo and its call for individual accountability on federal civil enforcement (D&O Diary)
  • Why are certain counties in Pennsylvania (such as Lackawanna) strong magnets for tort litigation? (Scranton Times-Tribune; HT to Overlawyered, article quotes editor Walter Olson)
  • Empty claim on empty packaging space: Federal judge says “it defies logic” that slack fill in ibuprofen bottle (that lists pill count on label) would deceive plaintiff into a purchase (Drug and Device Law)
  • Speaking of slack fill, a plaintiff named Wurtzburger is suing KFC for $20 million because her $20 bucket of chicken wasn’t overflowing (Abnormal Use)
  • Ninth Circuit denied rehearing in case discussed in WLF Legal Pulse guest commentary that equated falling air emissions with deposits of hazardous waste under CERCLA (Corporate Environmental Lawyer)
  • Ruling on a case noted in Sept. 30 WLF Legal Backgrounder, Seventh Circuit follows Supreme Court’s restrictive view of implied-certification theory under False Claims Act (Fried Frank FraudMail)
  • Two overlooked, but critical, aspects of DC Circuit’s decision finding the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s structure unconstitutional (Asset Securitization Report)
  • Expect more activist group petitions seeking threatened or endangered status for species based on future risk of climate change after recent adventurous Ninth Circuit ruling (Law and the Environment)

Telecom Regulation Experts Question FCC’s Conformity to Law, Constitution at WLF Briefing

Speakers:

  • Commissioner Ajit Pai, Federal Communications Commission
  • Harold Furchtgott-Roth, The Hudson Institute and FCC Commissioner, 1997-2001
  • Brett A. Shumate, Wiley Rein LLP

Related WLF Materials: