WLF Garners Fifth Consecutive US Supreme Court Victory with “Baker v. Microsoft”

supreme courtOn June 12 in Microsoft v. Baker, the US Supreme Court unanimously rejected a class-action litigation tactic that created an unfair advantage for plaintiffs in such suits. Both Justice Ginsburg in her majority opinion and Justice Thomas in his concurrence in judgment embraced arguments made in Washington Legal Foundation’s victorious amicus brief. WLF had also filed an amicus brief in support of Microsoft before an en banc panel of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and further filed in support of the company’s cert petition to the Supreme Court after its loss in the appeals court.

The Baker decision is the fifth consecutive Supreme Court victory for WLF. The other four cases are:

The Court has not yet released opinions in four additional cases in which WLF filed amicus briefs (CalPERS v. ANZ Securities, Inc.; Jennings v. Rodriguez; Ziglar v. Abbasi; and Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court), and we are also awaiting a decision on the cert petition WLF filed on behalf of its client, Chance Gordon, in Gordon v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

On Tuesday, June 27, 1:00-2:00 pm EST, WLF will be holding its 28th annual US Supreme Court end-of-the-Term briefing, which will focus on the cases noted above as well as other decisions that affect the free-enterprise system and economic liberties. Details appear below:

The U.S. Supreme Court: October 2016 Term Review
>RSVP to attend in person or live online to glammi@wlf.org
>Speakers:

 

 

No “Genericide” for Google: Ninth Circuit Upholds Company’s Trademark Against Cybersquatter’s Challenge

trademarkBy Jillian Beatty, a 2017 Judge K.K. Legett Fellow at Washington Legal Foundation who will be entering her third year at Texas Tech University School of Law in the fall.

Suppose you just bought a house. In the first few years as a home-owner, you revamp the backyard, remodel the master bathroom, and decorate in that mid-century modern style you had always loved. You have done a little maintenance on the pipes and replaced the garbage disposal in the kitchen, all costing you a pretty penny. But that’s ok. This is an investment. Then, just as your home is reaching its pinnacle, as the calls from Better Homes and Gardens and Architectural Digest start pouring in, a man knocks on the door and asks for the keys and the deed. You have done too good of a job maintaining this home and now you are going to lose it. You will receive no compensation. Continue reading

Supreme Court Alters Patent Venue Landscape: Eastern District Texas No Longer the Heartland of Patent Litigation

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor – Intellectual Property (Patents)

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Partner, Venable LLP, with William A. Hector, Associate, Venable LLP.

The US Supreme Court issued its decision in TC Heartland LLC v. Kraft Food Group Brands LLC altering the landscape of where patent owners may file patent infringement cases.  Previously, these cases could be filed in essentially any jurisdiction, allowing patent owners to select the forum of their choice.  TC Heartland  now requires that there be some connection between the accused infringer and the jurisdiction where suit is filed.  The Court ruled unanimously that “a domestic corporation ‘resides’ only in its State of incorporation for purposes of the patent venue statute.”  Continue reading

“Sandoz v. Amgen”: High Court to Weigh in on Biosimilars’ “Patent Dance”

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor – Intellectual Property (Patents)

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Partner, Venable LLP, with Tyler Hale, Associate, Venable LLP.

In 1984, Congress passed the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act, commonly known as the Hatch-Waxman Act, and redrew the legal landscape for intellectual property in the pharmaceutical industry.  The law balanced the need for brand-name drug innovators to profit from their research and development investments with the public good of low-cost generic drugs by creating a pathway for swift FDA approval of generic drugs immediately following the expiration of patent exclusivity.  By all accounts, the law has been a success, creating the drug lifecycle we know and expect today: new drugs enter the market at a high price with a limited period of exclusivity, after which several generic competitors enter the market and drive prices down to a fraction of their original cost. Continue reading

FTC Must Refocus on Harm to Consumers and Competition

FTC_Man_Controlling_Trade

Federal agencies regularly use statistics to demonstrate their relevance and justify their exorbitant budgets. The Justice Department, for instance, boasts about the billions it brought in from False Claims Act lawsuits last year. The Environmental Protection Agency brags about the amount of fines and years in jail resulting from its enforcement actions in 2016. But the public is rarely provided concrete evidence of how those incarcerations and billions in fines, say, actually reduce contracting fraud or improve the environment.

So, too, with the Federal Trade Commission. In recent years, FTC hasn’t missed an opportunity to tout its statistical successes to the public and congressional appropriators. In the process of piling up the number of cases brought and fines extracted trumpeted by Chairwoman Edith Ramirez in her resignation press release, however, a critical limitation on FTC’s mission and authority has taken a backseat: the need to prove consumer harm. Continue reading

Will Federal Circuit Finally Bring an End to “Form 18” Minimal Pleading for Direct Patent Infringement in 2017?

jhighGuest Commentary

By J High, Sidley Austin LLP*

In Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly and Ashcroft v. Iqbal, the US Supreme Court tightened the pleading standard for civil cases.  Because of a quirk of the exemplary forms formerly included with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (specifically, Form 18), the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit held that Twombly and Iqbal did not apply to claims of direct infringement of a patent (In re Bill of Lading Transmission & Processing Sys. Pat. Litig.).  I discussed this state of affairs in two 2012 Washington Legal Foundation Legal Backgrounders (3/23/12 and 10/5/12).

This past fall, the Federal Circuit issued another decision on the pleading standard in patent cases, Lyda v. CBS Corp., 838 F.3d 1331 (Fed. Cir. 2016).  However, Lyda did not address the question many have been waiting for the Federal Circuit to answer—how to implement the pleading standard of Iqbal and Twombly for claims of garden-variety direct infringement after the abrogation of Form 18.  The district court proceedings in Lyda all occurred while Form 18 was part of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and on appeal the Federal Circuit stated “that the repeal of Form 18 does not apply to this case.”  Id. at 1337 n.2. Continue reading

Who’s on Your Panel?: The Answer Increasingly Determines Software-Patent Decisions at the Federal Circuit

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor – Intellectual Property (Patents)

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Partner, Venable LLP, with Ryan T. Ward, Associate, Venable LLP. Mr. Ward was a Judge K.K. Legett Fellow at the Washington Legal Foundation in the summer of 2009 prior to his third year at Texas Tech School of Law.

The Federal Circuit continues to struggle with determinations of patentability under 35 U.S.C. § 101 in the wake of the Supreme Court’s Alice decision (Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank Int’l, 134 S. Ct. 2347 (2014)).  The most recent decision, Intellectual Ventures, LLC. v. Symantec Corp., (Intellectual Ventures) indicates a developing schism between the newer members of the court and the old guard. Continue reading