Supreme Court Observations: Halo Electronics v. Pulse Electronics

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor – Intellectual Property (Patents)

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Venable LLP

The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Halo Electronics, Inc v. Pulse Electronics, Inc. decision changes the standard for awarding enhanced damages in patent litigation. The ruling reversed a 2015 U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit decision that maintained that court’s longstanding approach to awarding enhanced damages.

In Halo, the Court altered the law on enhanced damages in three ways: 1) it eliminated the requirement to show objective recklessness; 2) it lowered the standard of proof from “clear and convincing evidence” to “preponderance of the evidence;” and 3) it adopted an abuse-of-discretion standard for the Federal Circuit’s review of a district court’s decision to grant enhanced damages. Continue reading

Federal Circuit Decision Final Word on Jurisdiction for Hatch-Waxman Act Patent Suits?

federal circuitOn June 20, 2016, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit declined to rehear en banc a panel’s decision in Acorda Therapeutics v. Mylan Pharmaceuticals from this past March.  The panel in Acorda ruled that when a generic drug manufacturer files with the FDA an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for approval to market a generic drug, that manufacturer is subject to personal jurisdiction in any jurisdiction in which it plans to direct sales of that drug if and once FDA approves its ANDA.  Since then, three district courts in four separate decisions have applied Acorda to deny a generic manufacturer’s Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 12(b)(2) motion based, at least in large part, on the ANDA filing.   Continue reading

WLF’s Annual End-of-Term Review Assesses Key Supreme Court Free-Enterprise Decisions

The U.S. Supreme Court: October 2015 Term Review

Speakers: The Honorable Jay Stephens, Kirkland & Ellis LLP; Andrew J. Pincus, Mayer Brown LLP; Elizabeth P. Papez, Winston & Strawn LLP; Jeffrey B. Wall, Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

Our speakers discussed Court rulings in the areas of class actions, arbitration, the federal False Claims Act, intellectual property, federal regulation, and property rights.

With New Rights Manager, Facebook Creates New Tool to Fight Against ‘Freebooting’ and Copyright Infringement

facebookIn mid-April, Facebook unveiled a new tool to help copyright holders combat infringing behavior.  The move comes after digital content creators alleged that Facebook was building its growing video-sharing platform by acquiescing to third parties’ posting of videos originally uploaded elsewhere (known as “freebooting”).  Critics of freebooting argue that the practice hurts creators by siphoning off views (and thus ad revenue from them and the original video platform, such as YouTube).  The new tool, called Rights Manager, is Facebook’s attempt to end these illegal practices and encourage digital-content creators to bring more of their content to Facebook’s video-sharing platform. Continue reading

Supreme Court Will Address Two Key Patent “Inter Partes” Review Standards in “Cuozzo Speed Technologies” Case

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor – Intellectual Property (Patents)

By Jeffri A. Kaminski, Partner, Venable LLP, with Leslie A. Lee, Associate, Venable LLP

In Cuozzo Speed Technologies v. Lee, the US Supreme Court will be deciding two important issues with respect to patent claim constructions in Inter Partes review (IPR) proceedings.  An IPR is a procedure instituted in the America Invents Act of 2012 (AIA) for challenging the validity of a United States patent before the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).  In Cuozzo the Court will resolve 1) what claim-construction standard should be used by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) in determining patent validity, and 2) whether the PTAB’s decisions are judicially reviewable.  PTAB is the entity within the USPTO that oversees IPR proceedings.  The case is set for oral argument on Monday, April 25. Continue reading

Federal Circuit Has an Opportunity to Curtail Patent Litigation Tourism in TC Heartland Case

Fairfield Inn, Tyler, Texas

Fairfield Inn, Tyler, Texas

This afternoon, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit will hear oral arguments in In re: TC Heartland, LLC. The case implicates the fundamental issue of where plaintiffs alleging patent infringement can file suit. Washington Legal Foundation was one of only two institutions to file an amicus brief in support of TC Heartland’s mandamus petition. WLF agrees that the patent venue statute does not permit TC Heartland to be sued in the District of Delaware. But our brief asks the Federal Circuit to also overrule its 1994 Beverly Hills Fan Co. v. Royal Sovereign Corp. decision. That decision, which allows nationwide corporations to be sued in any federal district where it does business, has precipitated the current epidemic of forum shopping by patent trolls. The availability of forum shopping inspires frivolous litigation that diverts businesses’ resources from innovation. Continue reading

Market-Based Efforts to Fight Online Copyright Piracy Earn a New Ally

copyrightWashington Legal Foundation has long supported industry self-help initiatives, including those aimed at protecting intellectual property rights. The WLF Legal Pulse, for instance, has highlighted industry efforts to self-police copyright infringement and reduce frivolous patent litigation (for example, here and here). On the copyright front, as we’ve previously discussed, websites that facilitate or traffic in unlawfully copied entertainment content, such as cyberlockers, cost the creative industry millions of dollars each year. The latest market-based effort to combat copyright theft is a voluntary agreement between the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and Donuts, Inc. (Donuts). According to the agreement signed on February 9, Donuts, the world’s largest domain-name registry, will designate MPAA as a “Trusted Notifier” and treat MPAA referrals of large-scale piracy expeditiously and with a presumption of credibility. Should Donuts find no holes in an MPAA request, it will suspend or terminate the domain. Continue reading