Commerce-Clause Challenge over Washington Coal-Export Terminal Overcomes First Hurdle

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Port of Longview, WA

In a March commentary, we appraised a legal challenge filed by two companies involved in the mining and delivery of coal against several Washington state officials for their role in blocking approval of a water-port terminal in Longview, Washington. The suit, which has attracted amici curiae briefs from neighboring states and other interested parties, took a step forward on May 30 when Judge Robert J. Bryan denied the defendants’ motion to dismiss. Continue reading “Commerce-Clause Challenge over Washington Coal-Export Terminal Overcomes First Hurdle”

Neither Reason nor Science Supports Class Actions against Diet Soda Makers

 

A Food Court Follies Analysis

No doubt, many a diet soda will be consumed this weekend. Will any of those consumers, though, purchase that soda—in reliance on the manufacturers’ devious use of “diet”—because they think it will assist in weight loss?

diet pepsiThat impression is the basis of a number of copycat consumer class-action lawsuits filed in New York and California by the same lawyers on behalf of soda purchasers against Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and Dr. Pepper Snapple Group. Four such suits have been dismissed, the most recent being Manuel v. Pepsi-Cola Co. in an pointedly written opinion by U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York Judge Paul A. Engelmayer. Continue reading “Neither Reason nor Science Supports Class Actions against Diet Soda Makers”

“Monkey Selfie” Copyright Ruling Reflects Key Appeals Court’s Wayward Standing-to-Sue Jurisprudence

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Photo via Wikimedia Commons

We’ve been on a bit of a standing-to-sue kick in this space lately (here, and here, for instance) and in Washington Legal Foundation’s publishing program (here and here). Article III’s standing requirement, the U.S. Supreme Court has explained, is “built on separation-of-powers principles” and “serves to prevent the judicial process from being used to usurp the powers of the political branches.” From a more practical vantage, a predictable body of law that confines courts’ jurisdiction to lawsuits alleging actual, redressable harms helps to limit defendants’—especially business defendants’—litigation costs by facilitating early dismissal of questionable claims.

Two WLF publications referenced above criticize the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit for issuing decisions that significantly relax the standing requirement of “injury in fact.” While reaching the right result, another recent Ninth Circuit decision, in the famed “monkey selfie” copyright case, exemplifies how truly off course the court’s standing jurisprudence has wandered. Continue reading ““Monkey Selfie” Copyright Ruling Reflects Key Appeals Court’s Wayward Standing-to-Sue Jurisprudence”

Cleaning Up the Asbestos Litigation Mess: A Role for DOJ?

DOJAsbestos—the heat-resistant, naturally occurring silicate mineral—disappeared from the manufacturing marketplace over 40 years ago. In those four decades, litigation involving asbestos has been as impervious to resolution as the mineral itself is to high temperatures. When we’ve asked mass-tort litigators “what’s the next asbestos?” some have answered—not entirely in jest—”asbestos.”

The reasons for asbestos litigation’s endurance are many, but defendants, judges, and public officials have started to spotlight the role of bankruptcy trusts and plaintiffs’ lawyers’ use of them as both shield and sword. Numerous voices, including state attorneys general and Members of Congress, have called on the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to investigate misconduct and potential fraud. DOJ has a number of potent oversight and enforcement options at its disposal, some of which are discussed below. Continue reading “Cleaning Up the Asbestos Litigation Mess: A Role for DOJ?”

Washington State Officials Usurp Federal Authority with Crusade to Block Export Terminal

Over the past several years, state and local governments have become more aggressive regulators of free-enterprise activity. Some of those states and municipalities have taken action in areas that either federal law or the U.S. Constitution reserve for uniform federal regulation.

For instance, states like Washington and California have either adopted or are pursuing their own “net neutrality” rules after the Federal Communications Commission repealed a 2015 rule. Scores of states, cities, and counties have sued to impose controls on federally approved prescription pain medications that would be different from those required by the Food and Drug Administration. And mayors, county supervisors, and state attorneys general are racing ahead of the federal government with lawsuits aimed at regulating the global concern of climate change.

Another example of what we’ll call extreme federalism has been percolating in the Pacific Northwest for over five years and is now being contested in federal court. Continue reading “Washington State Officials Usurp Federal Authority with Crusade to Block Export Terminal”

Hailing the First Amendment: NYC Taxi Authority’s Ad Ban Struck Down as Unconstitutional

NYCTLCTaxicab, livery, black car, and limousine companies in the Big Apple may own the vehicles their employees drive, but they know full well who really controls them: the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC). Passenger transportation is one of the city’s most heavily regulated businesses, but as a federal district court judge recently reminded TLC, those small business still have constitutional rights. Continue reading “Hailing the First Amendment: NYC Taxi Authority’s Ad Ban Struck Down as Unconstitutional”

Law of Copyright Reinterpretation Project Steers ALI Further Off Course

copyrightIn April 2015, a WLF Legal Pulse post expressed concern with a nascent American Law Institute (ALI) project, Restatement of the Law: Copyright. Three years later, the drafting process continues in the face of increasing criticism from intellectual property scholars, ALI members, and even the federal government’s chief copyright official. Some of those critiques echo and amplify the concerns we expressed initially and have repeated in our posts on ALI’s other troubled project, the liability-insurance-law Restatement.  Simply put, the Institute’s ambition to put its own imprint on the law imperils its credibility. Continue reading “Law of Copyright Reinterpretation Project Steers ALI Further Off Course”