Ninth Circuit Decision Underscores Need for Clarity on ADA’s Application in Cyberspace

patchworkDebate over whether the Americans with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) applies to websites has been raging for years—mostly in the federal courts. As happens all too often, federal legislators and regulators have remained mostly mute, leaving judges to resolve this thorny question. This default appeal to the judiciary, which has produced divergent decisions, deprives website owners the consistent and transparent fair notice that the free-enterprise system needs (and that businesses deserve under our Constitution) to function.

The Ninth Circuit is the latest court to stitch a new block onto the patchwork quilt of website-related ADA rulings. On January 15, the court held in Robles v. Domino’s Pizza, LLC that the company’s website was a service of a “place of public accommodation” (Domino’s physical stores) and thus must be accessible under the ADA. The court also rejected Domino’s argument that the Justice Department’s failure to offer formal guidance on the websites’ ADA status violated their Fifth Amendment right to due process. The Robles decision was highly anticipated and will have a broad impact, evidenced by the amicus brief filed by a coalition of business associations. Continue reading “Ninth Circuit Decision Underscores Need for Clarity on ADA’s Application in Cyberspace”