Airbnb v. NYC: Data Collection and Fourth Amendment Protection

airbnbDuring 2018, the hand-wringing demands for “better” protection of online consumers’ privacy (despite the likely costs, some of which we documented here) grew to a fever pitch. Easily forgotten amid the cacophony is data-collecting companies’ own expectation of privacy in their extremely valuable property. A federal court decision last week provides a timely reminder that businesses possess civil liberties too, which they can use to defend against unreasonable government intrusion. The decision also gives local, state, and federal regulators and legislators something to keep in mind as they rush to “do something” about data privacy.

The decision arises from New York City’s attempt to minimize the societal ills that purportedly accompany short-term rentals. Citing the difficulty of enforcing a 2010 city ordinance that prohibits certain rental arrangements, the City Council approved a second ordinance last year requiring all home-share “booking services” to hand over monthly transaction reports. Regulators could then scour the reports for violations of the 2010 law. The 2018 law, which was to take effect on February 2, imposes fines of up to $1,500 for each withheld listing. Continue reading Airbnb v. NYC: Data Collection and Fourth Amendment Protection”