WLF Supreme Court Preview Briefing Delves into Cases and Petitions Affecting Free Enterprise

Our October Term 2018 preview aired live at 12:30 on September 18. Thomas Goldstein of Goldstein & Russell, P.C. moderated a panel that featured Professor John Yoo of UC Berkeley School of Law; Shay Dvoretzky of Jones Day; and Beth Brinkmann of Covington & Burling LLP.

Washington Legal Foundation has filed amicus briefs in four cases currently on the Court’s October 2018 docket and in support of five certiorari petitions:

Merits cases

Cert. Petitions

Relevant WLF Publication

Air & Liquid Systems Corp. v. Devries: Asbestos Litigation’s “Bare Metals” Defense Goes Before the U.S. Supreme Court

Courts Reject Buyers’ Remorse and Wasted Time as Redressable Class-Wide Injuries

article IIIWe return once again (click here for past posts) to the seemingly banal legal doctrine of standing to sue—a subject that few, if any, likely contemplated when celebrating Constitution Day this week. This doctrine does, however, arise from the Constitution’s ingenious separation of powers among the three branches of government. Article III limits the judiciary’s role to resolving “cases” and “controversies.” From that the U.S. Supreme Court derived the standing doctrine as a way to test whether plaintiffs’ claims are fit for judicial resolution. A key part of the test is whether a plaintiff can factually establish that she suffered a concrete “injury in fact” that can be traced to the defendant’s conduct and can be redressed by a judicial remedy.

Legal claims based on conjectural or hypothetical harm, therefore, should not be inundating federal courts’ dockets. Unfortunately, too many no-injury class actions are passing the standing test, thanks in part to broadly worded state consumer-protection laws (and judges’ reluctance to reject jurisdiction). Just last week, for instance, a federal court ruled that state fraud laws are so broad that consumers who purchased vehicles with faulty ignition switches can recover damages even if the defect never manifested itself. And earlier this year, the Supreme Court refused to review an appellate court decision that allows eye-drop users to sue based on the speculative theory that eye-drop producers would charge the same price for a vial with a smaller dispensing hole.

Given the current trend on standing, it is critical to highlight positive outcomes in this area. We discuss two encouraging decisions here, one from the court that allowed the aforementioned eye-drop suit to proceed, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, and the second from a federal court in California, a state with perhaps the nation’s most permissive consumer-protection laws. Continue reading “Courts Reject Buyers’ Remorse and Wasted Time as Redressable Class-Wide Injuries”