Update: Federal District Court Rejects Minority View on Pharma “Innovator Liability”

pillsIn a recent post, West Virginia’s High Court Rejects Novel Theory of “Innovator Liability”, WLF Senior Litigation Counsel Cory Andrews discussed a state court decision that declined liability on a pharmaceutical manufacturer for alleged harms caused by a drug it did not produce. In doing so, the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals parted company with the highest courts of two other states, California and Massachusetts, which earlier this year embraced the minority view that plaintiffs can recover damages from so-called branded pharmaceutical companies for harms allegedly caused by the generic copy of the the brand-name drug.

On May 21, a U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts judge overseeing a multidistrict litigation, In re: Zofran (Ondansetron) Products Liability Litigation, followed the majority view of innovator liability and dismissed three claims filed by plaintiffs who had only ingested the generic version of Zofran. Continue reading “Update: Federal District Court Rejects Minority View on Pharma “Innovator Liability””

California Supreme Court Limits Employers’ Ability to Characterize Workers as Independent Contractors

JohnQuieroLE - resized [45] 170504_0034_1a_square2Guest Commentary

By John F. Querio, a Partner, and Lacey L. Estudillo, an Appellate Fellow, with Horvitz & Levy LLP.

California courts and administrative agencies have long used a multi-factor common-law test, as summarized by S.G. Borello & Sons, Inc. v. Department of Industrial Relations, 48 Cal. 3d 341 (1989), to determine whether workers are independent contractors or employees under California law.  The employee-independent contractor distinction is important because employee status brings with it a host of burdensome wage and hour and other legal obligations with which the employer must comply, multiplying costs exponentially.

The key factor under the Borello common-law test for determining employment status has traditionally been the right to control the manner and means by which the work is to be performed.  Despite decades of settled jurisprudence on this issue, in Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court, No. S222732, 2018 WL 1999120 (Cal. Apr. 30, 2018), the California Supreme Court adopted a new test for determining independent-contractor status for purposes of wage and hour obligations under California law. Continue reading “California Supreme Court Limits Employers’ Ability to Characterize Workers as Independent Contractors”