Bigger than a Bread Box? Defendants’ Shelf of Equipment Isn’t Enough for Patent Venue

bread boxFor years, patent owners, especially those that have never “performed” the patent, used the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit’s broad interpretation of the patent venue statute to force infringement lawsuits into favorable jurisdictions.  The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas was the model; often referred to as the “patent district,” patent holders most frequently—and non-practicing entities (aka “patent trolls”) overwhelmingly—filed suit in the Eastern District of Texas, regardless of where the allegedly infringing party conducted business.  Patent trolls leaned on sympathetic (and self-interested) judges to bully easy settlements out of defendants and force end consumers to pay more for all sorts of products. Continue reading “Bigger than a Bread Box? Defendants’ Shelf of Equipment Isn’t Enough for Patent Venue”