Heeding Criticism from Many Corners, ALI Pulls Liability Insurance Restatement Before Membership Vote

white flagEarlier this month in Insurance Liability Project Exemplifies American Law Institute’s Mission Drift, we discussed an especially troubling instance of where the American Law Institute (ALI), a private organization known for its “Restatements” of common law in areas such as torts, products liability, and contracts, was instead revising the law. On Tuesday, May 23, ALI announced at its annual meeting that rather than hold a final vote on the Restatement of Law, Liability Insurance as scheduled, the draft’s Reporters (i.e. authors) “agreed that another year of work” was needed on the project. Continue reading “Heeding Criticism from Many Corners, ALI Pulls Liability Insurance Restatement Before Membership Vote”

As CMS Considers Restricting Access to Pain Medication, Greater Opportunities for Public Input Are Required

CMSThe Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is ramping up efforts to limit patients’ access to pain medication without giving affected parties sufficient notice or opportunity for comment.  Since the start of 2017, CMS has released three separate guidance documents on how insurers and payers should impose new limits on the use of opioids.  While opioid abuse undoubtedly presents a serious public health issue, CMS should take steps to foster transparency and avoid harming patients and providers alike by offering them a meaningful opportunity to participate in the development of policies that could limit pain management.  CMS also must do more to ensure that it adheres to statutes requiring complete openness whenever it solicits advice from advisory committees that include members who are not federal government employees.       Continue reading “As CMS Considers Restricting Access to Pain Medication, Greater Opportunities for Public Input Are Required”

“Gordon v. CFPB” Provides a Good Vehicle to Rein in Executive Branch Authority

CFPB[Ed. Note: For more on the Gordon cert petition, watch WLF’s May 22 press conference, which featured former Solicitor General Gregory Garre, at our YouTube channel.]

The US Constitution imposes important checks on the exercise of executive power by the federal government.  In particular, Article II specifies that executive power may be exercised only at the behest of properly appointed “officers” of the United States, and it sets forth detailed requirements for the appointment and Senate confirmation of such officers.  However, a recent decision from the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit threatens to undermine those checks on federal power by permitting the Executive Branch to retroactively ratify actions taken by officials not properly appointed as “officers.”  The Supreme Court should review and overturn the appeals court decision, which is the subject of a pending certiorari petitionGordon v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Case No. 16-673.  Washington Legal Foundation represents Mr. Gordon in the Supreme Court. Continue reading ““Gordon v. CFPB” Provides a Good Vehicle to Rein in Executive Branch Authority”

Briefing Program Assesses WLF’s Supreme Court Cert Petition in “Gordon v. CFPB”

Gordon v. CFPB: Will the High Court Halt an End-Run Around the Appointments Clause?

screen shot Gordon MB

To view this WLF Media Briefing program on our IBM Cloud Video channel click here.
To view the program on our YouTube channel, click here.

The program featured commentary on WLF cert petition on behalf of our client Chance Gordon currently pending before the US Supreme Court. The Court may decide as early as this Thursday, May 25, on our review request. WLF’s petition argues that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau could not lawfully prosecute a claim against Mr. Gordon at a point when the agency lacked a lawfully appointed director.

Our Gordon v. CFPB page, which contains our briefs and press releases in the case, is available here.

Corrosive Legal Uncertainty Remains after DC Circuit’s Rehearing Denial in “Net Neutrality” Case

RothGuest Commentary

By Arielle Roth, The Hudson Institute*

It came as no surprise last week when the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit denied the request for en banc rehearing in US Telecom v. FCC, better known as the “net neutrality” case.  As a technical matter, the panel decision upheld the Federal Communication Commission’s 2015 Title II order, which reclassified broadband Internet as a “telecommunications service” and in turn subjected broadband providers to common carriage regulation. Such a grant would have been rare in any event. Further, in the view of Judge Sri Srinivasan’s opinion concurring in the denial of rehearing, the issues were unfit for judicial review in light of the announcement by current FCC Chairman Ajit Pai of a rulemaking to reverse the previous FCC’s order.

On the contrary, it is precisely because the current FCC seeks to undo the rules in question that the DC Circuit ought to have granted en banc rehearing. Continue reading “Corrosive Legal Uncertainty Remains after DC Circuit’s Rehearing Denial in “Net Neutrality” Case”

Department of Labor’s Fiduciary Rule Is Vulnerable on First Amendment Grounds

DOLPromulgated in April 2016, the Department of Labor’s (DOL) highly controversial Fiduciary Rule drastically expands the universe of retirement investment advisors and employees who are deemed to be “fiduciaries” under federal law. Abandoning 40 years of settled statutory interpretation of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) and parallel provisions of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC), DOL now maintains that a fiduciary is anyone who provides “recommendations” that are individualized or directed to a specific recipient for consideration in making investment or management decisions with respect to securities or other property of an ERISA plan or an IRA. Continue reading “Department of Labor’s Fiduciary Rule Is Vulnerable on First Amendment Grounds”

One Loss before ALJ Doesn’t Unmake SEC’s Home-Court Advantage

Corporate Governance/Securities Law

bainbridgeStephen M. Bainbridge, William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law.

Las Vegas odds makers say that having the home field is worth about three points to the average National Football League team, which is helpful but not a guarantee of victory. For some teams, however, the home-field advantage gives them an almost insurmountable edge. Between 2012 and 2015, for example, the Seattle Seahawks won 27 out of 32 home games and all four of their home playoff games. During that period, no other NFL team had a bigger home-field advantage.

Despite the huge advantage playing at home gave the Seahawks, it didn’t make them unbeatable. After all, they did lose five out of those 36 games. All of which is why the press hullaballoo over a Securities and Exchange Commission administrative law judge’s (ALJ) decision in In re Hill1 is much overblown. Continue reading “One Loss before ALJ Doesn’t Unmake SEC’s Home-Court Advantage”