Circuit Split Clouds Definition of “Whistleblower” under Dodd-Frank Act, Complicating Corporate Compliance

829-Brower_GregjohnsonGuest Commentary

by Greg Brower and Brett W. Johnson, Snell & Wilmer LLP*

A recent decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit further complicated the issue of when an employee can be considered a whistleblower under the Dodd-Frank Act. In Berman v. Neo@Ogilvy, the Second Circuit reversed a district court decision that the plaintiff was not a whistleblower, concluding that the governing definition of “whistleblower” was not the one found in the language of Dodd-Frank, but was the broader one found in a subsequently adopted SEC rule. This interpretation runs counter to a 2013 decision from the Fifth Circuit, Asadi v. G.E. Energy, LLC, and sets up a circuit split that the Supreme Court may be asked to resolve. Continue reading “Circuit Split Clouds Definition of “Whistleblower” under Dodd-Frank Act, Complicating Corporate Compliance”

FDA’s Latest Regulatory Salvo at “Added Sugars” Ignores Federal Laws, Due Process, Part II

FDAThis is the second part of a two-part commentary on FDA’s requirements that added sugars be listed on the food Nutrition Facts panel, and that a Daily Reference Value (DRV) be set for added sugars and included in the panel footnote. For part I, click here.

 FDA’s Reliance Solely on a DGAC Report to Establish a DRV is Unprecedented

When implementing the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act, FDA first set daily reference values in 1993 based on “sufficient scientific consensus,” a standard established by the agency under that law. FDA did not rely on a federal advisory committee’s report. Moreover, it relied only minimally on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans itself. Instead, FDA cited numerous consensus reports which, taken together, constituted “sufficient scientific consensus.” Continue reading “FDA’s Latest Regulatory Salvo at “Added Sugars” Ignores Federal Laws, Due Process, Part II”