Environmentalists for Foreign Energy Dependence Strike Again

california_expensive_gas_200That special-interest activism has negative consequences is a message Washington Legal Foundation has been communicating for 35 years.

The consequences are sometimes subtle or only become clear over time. In other instances like the outcome we write about here, the consequences are immediately obvious. On January 29, Royal Dutch Shell PLC, citing a January 22 U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit decision as a last straw, announced it would indefinitely put on hold plans to drill for oil beneath Alaska’s Chukchi Sea.

Shell has reportedly invested over $6 billion in its quest to become the first company to extract some of the possibly 27 billion barrels of oil from that offshore location. The leases it obtained from the federal government cost $2.6 billion alone. Over the last eight years, Shell has had to endure delay after delay as a cadre of activist groups—let’s call them collectively Environmentalists for Foreign Energy Dependence—filed lawsuit after lawsuit to slow final approval. A Legal Pulse post from July 2012 details several of these actions, which attacked, among other things, EPA’s emissions permits, Shell’s oil spill plan, and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management’s (BOEM) environmental impact assessment supporting the lease sale. Continue reading “Environmentalists for Foreign Energy Dependence Strike Again”