Annual Meeting Holdup: Securities Class Action Lawyers’ Latest Scheme

Cross-posted at WLF contributor site

You’re a publicly traded company, and it’s a week before your annual meeting.  The SEC had no objections to your proxy statement, and it’s been sent to shareholders. Your focus should be on final meeting details, but instead, you are working with your lawyers to fend off a class action lawsuit which threatens to forestall the meeting.

This is not a bad dream, but an awake nightmare that an increasing number of public companies are facing. It’s the latest securities class action lawsuit “innovation” — just before an annual meeting, allege that a company’s proxy statements omit “material” information and thus violate general state-law duties to disclose; demand trivial changes to the proxy and high-six-figure fees; and stalk your next victim.

As leading securities defense litigator Bruce Vanyo noted at D&O Diary, at least 20 companies have faced such suits this year, with most claims involving advisory “say on pay” votes and votes on other compensation issues such as stock purchases. The suits are a mutation of disclosure-oriented class actions that are routinely filed against companies going through mergers or acquisitions. These new proxy challenges are of the cookie-cutter ilk common in securities class actions, with the same law firm and often the same investor acting as the lead plaintiff. Continue reading “Annual Meeting Holdup: Securities Class Action Lawyers’ Latest Scheme”