Supreme Court Has Second Chance to Resolve Circuit Split on Two Criminal Securities Fraud Issues

SchaerrGuest Commentary

By Gene C. Schaerr, a Partner with Schaerr Duncan LLP in Washington, DC. Mr. Schaerr is Counsel of Record for Mr. Ellison on the certiorari petition discussed here.

The U.S. Supreme Court may be about to resolve two issues of enormous importance to anyone involved, directly or indirectly, in the sale of securities.  The case that may provide the vehicle for such a ruling, Ellison v. United States, was recently the subject of an order directing the U.S. Solicitor General to file a response to the defendants’ petition for certiorari by May 21.  That petition challenges a U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit decision that, as the Cato Institute, Reason Foundation, and a group of law professors explained in a supporting amicus brief, exacerbates a “system” already “stacked in favor of the government.” Continue reading “Supreme Court Has Second Chance to Resolve Circuit Split on Two Criminal Securities Fraud Issues”

Asbestos-Liability-Suit Judges Should Be Wary of Plaintiffs’ Expert’s “Notice” Testimony

RobertWrightFeatured Expert Contributor, Mass Torts—Asbestos

Robert H. Wright, a Partner with Horvitz & Levy LLP in Los Angeles, CA

Anyone involved in asbestos litigation has come across the work of Barry Castleman.  By his own account, Castleman has testified for plaintiffs as an expert witness in over 400 trials in asbestos cases discussing the medical literature written about the mineral over the past 100+ years.  Castleman clearly possesses an encyclopedic knowledge of asbestos, but when considering whether his testimony is admissible, trial judges must ask:  is it all inadmissible hearsay? Continue reading “Asbestos-Liability-Suit Judges Should Be Wary of Plaintiffs’ Expert’s “Notice” Testimony”

Tronox/Cristal Merger Fight Highlights the FTC/DOJ Divide in U.S. Merger Control Proceedings

06633 - Royall, M. Sean ( Dallas )Featured Expert Column: Antitrust & Competition Policy — Federal Trade Commission

By M. Sean Royall and Richard H. Cunningham, Partners with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, and Justin Epner, an Associate in the firm’s Washington, DC office.  The authors would like to thank Jasper Hicks, who is an Associate in Gibson Dunn’s Denver, CO office, for his substantial contributions to this post.

In early 2017, Mississippi-based titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment producer Tronox Limited (“Tronox”) agreed to purchase the TiO2 business of one of its rivals, Saudi Arabian producer Cristal (“Cristal”).  Alleging a horizontal competitive effects theory, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) voted in December 2017 to challenge the deal in its internal administrative court.  Roughly two months after the FTC initiated the administrative challenge, however, the litigation took an interesting and unusual turn—Tronox filed a federal lawsuit of its own against the Commission in the Northern District of Mississippi.  Continue reading “Tronox/Cristal Merger Fight Highlights the FTC/DOJ Divide in U.S. Merger Control Proceedings”

WLF Welcomes Gregory A. Brower Back to its Legal Policy Advisory Board

Brower_GregWe are pleased to note that attorney Gregory A. Brower has accepted our invitation to rejoin Washington Legal Foundation’s Legal Policy Advisory Board. Greg joined the Board in 2010 and was an active member until stepping down in 2016 after accepting a position as Deputy General Counsel of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

He most recently served as Assistant Director for the FBI’s Office of Congressional Affairs. In his return to private practice, Greg joined the law firm Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, LLP as a Shareholder in the Washington DC and Las Vegas and Reno, NV offices.

Greg’s work at the FBI is just a part of his history in public service at both the state and federal levels. He served five terms in the Nevada Legislature and held the position as Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee prior to joining the FBI. Before that, he was the United States Attorney for the District of Nevada, and held positions as General Counsel and Inspector General of the U.S. Government Printing Office.

Cleaning Up the Asbestos Litigation Mess: A Role for DOJ?

DOJAsbestos—the heat-resistant, naturally occurring silicate mineral—disappeared from the manufacturing marketplace over 40 years ago. In those four decades, litigation involving asbestos has been as impervious to resolution as the mineral itself is to high temperatures. When we’ve asked mass-tort litigators “what’s the next asbestos?” some have answered—not entirely in jest—”asbestos.”

The reasons for asbestos litigation’s endurance are many, but defendants, judges, and public officials have started to spotlight the role of bankruptcy trusts and plaintiffs’ lawyers’ use of them as both shield and sword. Numerous voices, including state attorneys general and Members of Congress, have called on the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to investigate misconduct and potential fraud. DOJ has a number of potent oversight and enforcement options at its disposal, some of which are discussed below. Continue reading “Cleaning Up the Asbestos Litigation Mess: A Role for DOJ?”

Second Circuit Shuts Down Duplicative Regulation by Litigation of Organic Products

organicA January 9, 2018 WLF Legal Pulse post applauded a federal district court’s textbook application of implied-preemption analysis in dismissing a consumer-protection suit that alleged mislabeling of an organic infant formula. A recent decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Marentette, et al. v. Abbott Laboratories, Inc. similarly utilized implied preemption to reject a putative class action presenting nearly identical claims involving another brand of organic infant formula. The decision should put an end to plaintiffs’ use of state consumer-protection suits to regulate products bearing the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) “Organic” symbol. Continue reading “Second Circuit Shuts Down Duplicative Regulation by Litigation of Organic Products”

Federal Court Offers an Exemplar on Defusing the E-Discovery Litigation Weapon

quickenAny civil litigation target knows that the highest costs of defending a lawsuit arise not from the courtroom or motion work, but from discovery.  Those costs have paradoxically skyrocketed in the digital era.  Though computers made it faster and cheaper to find and disclose documents, the volume of discoverable documents has infinitely increased, inspiring overwhelming production requests that courts must weigh when issuing discovery orders.

As outlined in a WLF Legal Backgrounder, those burgeoning electronic discovery (or e-discovery) demands inspired the U.S. Judicial Conference to amend the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure in 2015.  Among other changes, the amendments altered the scope of discovery under Rule 26 by imposing a stricter proportionality test for e-discovery.  Continue reading “Federal Court Offers an Exemplar on Defusing the E-Discovery Litigation Weapon”