USDA’s Unconstitutional Ban of Food and Beverage Ads Establishes Dangerous Precedent

high-school-cafeteria-coloradoIn the dog days of summer 2016, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) ordered local government authorities to ban advertising for a select group of “disfavored” food and beverage products. The agency’s brazen action establishes a deeply troubling precedent in government’s efforts to usurp our freedom to choose what we eat and drink. Over the last several years, Washington Legal Foundation has closely tracked and strategically opposed actions such as USDA’s ban through our “Eating Away Our Freedoms” project. We launched that project five years ago this month on October 20, 2011.

The website is organized by the four major tactics that activists use to denigrate certain foods and beverages and to stigmatize consumers’ choice of those products: regulation, litigation, taxation, and public-relations demonization. For several years, the “regulation” page contained far fewer references to news articles and other analyses than the other three. But as government’s appetite for food-related mandates and restrictions has grown, the number of “regulation” entries has ballooned. USDA’s ad ban is perhaps the most pernicious regulation has ever encountered. Continue reading

Florida Appeals Court Invokes “Daubert” to Reject “Every Exposure” Causation in Asbestos Case

Tager_09181Featured Expert Column: Judicial Gatekeeping of Expert Evidence

By Evan M. Tager, Mayer Brown LLP, with Carl J. Summers, Mayer Brown LLP

Plaintiffs in asbestos cases often maintain that every asbestos exposure above background level is a substantial contributing factor to mesothelioma. That theory has been roundly rejected by courts. In a recent opinion, an intermediate appellate court in Florida joined the chorus of decisions refusing to credit the “every exposure above background level” theory.

In Crane Co. v. DeLisle, 2016 WL 4771438 (Fla. Dist. Ct. App. Sept. 14, 2016), the plaintiff developed mesothelioma after allegedly working around “Cranite” sheet gaskets containing chrysotile asbestos fibers and smoking asbestos-containing cigarettes in the 1950s. Following a trial involving multiple defendants, a jury awarded the plaintiff $8 million in damages. The Florida District Court of Appeal, however, reversed and remanded for entry of a directed verdict in favor of Crane Co., the manufacturer of the sheet gaskets, and a new trial for R.J. Reynolds, the cigarette manufacturer. Continue reading

Telecom Regulation Experts Question FCC’s Conformity to Law, Constitution at WLF Briefing


  • Commissioner Ajit Pai, Federal Communications Commission
  • Harold Furchtgott-Roth, The Hudson Institute and FCC Commissioner, 1997-2001
  • Brett A. Shumate, Wiley Rein LLP

Related WLF Materials:


WLF Web Seminar Assesses Criminalization of Food-Safety Regulation



Related Materials:

  • Powerpoint slides used by Mr. Neale available here
  • WLF Legal Opinion Letter authored by David Debold on US v. DeCoster, discussed in seminar, available here

After Oral Argument in “Salman v. US,” Will Supreme Court Meaningfully Limit What Counts as Insider Trading?

bainbridgeFeatured Expert Contributor — Corporate Governance/Securities Law

Stephen M. Bainbridge, William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

Over a three-year period from 2004 to 2007, Citigroup investment banker Maher Kara disclosed confidential nonpublic information about upcoming mergers and acquisitions to his brother Michael Kara. In turn, Michael disclosed the information to his close friend Bassam Salman, who then indirectly traded in the affected stocks. When Salman was tried on charges of illegal insider trading, the government offered evidence that he knew the information originated with Maher.

The case presented two issues: First, what is the basis of liability when an insider tips information to an outsider? Second, what must the government prove in order to hold a remote tippee liable when the information is passed down a chain from tipper to tippee to a tippee of that tippee and so on? Continue reading

In Mixed Opinion, Ninth Circuit Allows “All Natural Fruit” Litigation to Continue While Decertifying Class

dolefruitOn September 30, just two weeks after hearing oral argument in the case (which we previewed here), the Ninth Circuit released an unpublished opinion in Brazil v. Dole Packaged Foods, partially reversing the district court.  The opinion correctly upheld the district court’s dismissal of one of Brazil’s “outlandish theor[ies]” and its decertification of the class.  Unfortunately, the Ninth Circuit relied on nonbinding FDA guidance and warning letters to evaluate what would mislead a reasonable consumer, reversing the district court’s dismissal of his other claims.  Although not officially precedential, the opinion is worth reviewing because it has the potential to guide lower courts and gives insight into the Ninth Circuit’s future food-labeling decisions. Continue reading

Video of WLF’s 30th Annual Preview Briefing of US Supreme Court Term Now Available

Our annual briefing was moderated by WLF Legal Policy Advisory Board Chairman Jay Stephens and featured commentary on free-enterprise-oriented cases the Court will hear this Term by Neal Katyal of Hogan Lovells and Daryl Joseffer of King & Spalding LLP.

The following materials were provided to attendees: