WLF Web Seminar Assesses Criminalization of Food-Safety Regulation



Related Materials:

  • Powerpoint slides used by Mr. Neale available here
  • WLF Legal Opinion Letter authored by David Debold on US v. DeCoster, discussed in seminar, available here

After Oral Argument in “Salman v. US,” Will Supreme Court Meaningfully Limit What Counts as Insider Trading?

bainbridgeFeatured Expert Contributor — Corporate Governance/Securities Law

Stephen M. Bainbridge, William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

Over a three-year period from 2004 to 2007, Citigroup investment banker Maher Kara disclosed confidential nonpublic information about upcoming mergers and acquisitions to his brother Michael Kara. In turn, Michael disclosed the information to his close friend Bassam Salman, who then indirectly traded in the affected stocks. When Salman was tried on charges of illegal insider trading, the government offered evidence that he knew the information originated with Maher.

The case presented two issues: First, what is the basis of liability when an insider tips information to an outsider? Second, what must the government prove in order to hold a remote tippee liable when the information is passed down a chain from tipper to tippee to a tippee of that tippee and so on? Continue reading

In Mixed Opinion, Ninth Circuit Allows “All Natural Fruit” Litigation to Continue While Decertifying Class

dolefruitOn September 30, just two weeks after hearing oral argument in the case (which we previewed here), the Ninth Circuit released an unpublished opinion in Brazil v. Dole Packaged Foods, partially reversing the district court.  The opinion correctly upheld the district court’s dismissal of one of Brazil’s “outlandish theor[ies]” and its decertification of the class.  Unfortunately, the Ninth Circuit relied on nonbinding FDA guidance and warning letters to evaluate what would mislead a reasonable consumer, reversing the district court’s dismissal of his other claims.  Although not officially precedential, the opinion is worth reviewing because it has the potential to guide lower courts and gives insight into the Ninth Circuit’s future food-labeling decisions. Continue reading

Video of WLF’s 30th Annual Preview Briefing of US Supreme Court Term Now Available

Our annual briefing was moderated by WLF Legal Policy Advisory Board Chairman Jay Stephens and featured commentary on free-enterprise-oriented cases the Court will hear this Term by Neal Katyal of Hogan Lovells and Daryl Joseffer of King & Spalding LLP.

The following materials were provided to attendees:

Using “Daubert” to Exclude Plaintiffs’ Use of Flawed Surveys in Civil Litigation

Tager_09181Featured Expert Column: Judicial Gatekeeping of Expert Evidence

By Evan M. Tager, Mayer Brown LLP, with Carl J. Summers, Mayer Brown LLP

Expert testimony is typically thought of as providing an insight into the evidence in the case, or drawing a conclusion from the evidence, that requires knowledge beyond the ken of a typical judge or juror.  But expert testimony also can be used as a substitute for evidence that a party cannot, or does not want to, present through traditional evidentiary methods.  Although courts have allowed such expert testimony in certain contexts, there is cause for concern when a party offers an expert whose function is to fill a gap in the evidence.

Notable among this category of expert testimony are opinions offered during class-certification proceedings in an effort to show that a case can be efficiently managed on a class-wide basis.  Such testimony often takes the form of surveys or other statistical sampling techniques designed to establish liability or damages on a class-wide basis without requiring adjudication of each individual claim.  Continue reading

Divergent Philosophies on Merger Enforcement Emerge from Senior DOJ, FTC Antitrust Officials’ Speeches

Antitrust & Competition — U.S. Department of Justice

swisherAnthony W. Swisher, a Partner in the Washington, DC office of Squire Patton Boggs (US) LLP.

*Ed. Note: With this post, Mr. Swisher is assuming the role of Featured Expert Contributor on Antitrust & Competition—DOJ.  The WLF Legal Pulse welcomes him on board, and we thank his predecessor, Mark J. Botti, for his contributions on DOJ-Antitrust matters during the past two years.

Observers looking for clues as to how federal antitrust enforcement could develop in the next administration took note of a June speech by Senator Elizabeth Warren. Senator Warren laid out some aggressive policy views that would result in a marked shift in antitrust enforcement doctrine if put into place. She decried a so-called “concentration problem” and lamented that “competition is dying.” Senator Warren called for the antitrust enforcement agencies to “hold the line” on horizontal mergers, and was sharply critical of the established agency practice of obtaining divestiture relief, claiming that “too often, [divestitures] don’t work.” Continue reading

The Supreme Court’s NOT Top 10: October Term 2015 Petitions the Justices Should Have Granted

supreme courtThis Monday the U.S. Supreme Court will conduct its Long Conference, so named for the larger than usual number of certiorari petitions it considers there.  With the fate of so many cert petitions hanging in the balance—and the overwhelming majority of them about to be denied—now is an opportune time to look back at the top 10 cases that were wrongly denied cert in the Court’s last term.

As with the previous installments of my “Not Top 10” list (see here and here), no more than half the cases discussed below will be ones in which Washington Legal Foundation filed a brief in support of certiorari.  Also, the cases will once again be limited to those that affect economic liberty, including the need for legal certainty around key legal policies and regulatory regimes.  From WLF’s free-enterprise perspective, those cases that implicate competition in the marketplace, limited and accountable government, individual and business civil liberties, or rule of law concerns matter the most. Continue reading