FTC’s Action against “Repetitive” Filing of Citizen Petitions Reflects Expanding Pharma-Sector Enforcement Program

Featured Expert Column: Antitrust & Competition Policy — Federal Trade Commission

06633 - Royall, M. Sean ( Dallas )By M. Sean Royall, a Partner with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, with Richard H. Cunningham, Of Counsel in the firm’s Denver, CO office, and Andrew B. Blumberg, an Associate Attorney in the firm’s Dallas, TX office.

On February 7th, 2017, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed a complaint alleging that Shire ViroPharma Inc. (Shire) violated the antitrust laws by filing sham citizen petitions in an effort to forestall generic competition for its branded prescription drug, Vancocin.  The case is another stepping stone in the agency’s steadily expanding efforts to police what it views as potential antitrust abuses in the pharmaceutical sector. Continue reading “FTC’s Action against “Repetitive” Filing of Citizen Petitions Reflects Expanding Pharma-Sector Enforcement Program”

SCOTUS Seeks Solicitor General’s Views on Apple’s Cert. Petition in Antitrust Suit

app storeIn an orders list issued today, the U.S Supreme Court invited the Solicitor General of the United States to file a brief expressing the federal government’s views on the petition for certiorari in Apple, Inc. v. Pepper. The case, in which Washington Legal Foundation filed an amicus brief supporting Apple’s request for review, involves a forty-year old Supreme Court doctrine dictating that only direct purchasers of good or services may file private enforcement actions under federal antitrust laws.

The Court occasionally seeks the federal government’s views on a petition for certiorari in cases in which the government is not directly involved, but that implicate significant federal interests. In Supreme Court-speak, this is known as a CVSG: Calling for the Views of the Solicitor General. Continue reading “SCOTUS Seeks Solicitor General’s Views on Apple’s Cert. Petition in Antitrust Suit”

WLF Webinar, October 11, 1:00 PM: Winning Personal Jurisdiction and Venue Battles

Personal Jurisdiction and Venue Disputes: Succeeding in a Changed Legal Environment
Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 1:00-2:00 pm EST

To view live on WLF’s Ustream channel, click here.

Featuring:

Description: Previously relegated to law-school classroom debate, personal jurisdiction and venue are now front-of-mind issues for civil litigators. Our speakers will address how lower courts, and the plaintiffs’ bar, have responded to the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent rebukes of forum shopping. They will also identify the open questions and possible loopholes in the new jurisprudence, and discuss strategic responses on how to obtain and keep a “home court” advantage.

Federal Preemption Ruling Flushes Another Eye-Drop Class Action

eyedropAnyone who’s ever used eye drops has experienced solution overflow. You tilt your head back, pry your eye open, hold the dispenser close to your eyeball, and even though you squeeze very gently, some of the liquid flows onto your cheek. What is your logical next move? Is it to grab a tissue and dab up the excess, or reach for the phone and call your lawyer? As readers of the WLF Legal Pulse learned from a March 31, 2017 post, some overflow sufferers have actually done the latter.

That March 31 commentary recounted the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit’s dismissal of a class action against nine eye-drop makers alleging that consumers suffered economic harm from a needlessly oversized drop of medicine. A decision in another eye-drop-overflow suit filed in Massachusetts, Gustavesen v. Alcon Laboratories, et. al, recently came to our attention (HT to our friends at the indispensable FDA Law Blog).

The outcome of this suit was the same as the Eike v. Allergan, Inc. in the Seventh Circuit—class dismissed. Unlike Judge Posner’s typically curt, fanciful opinion in Eike, which tossed out the claims for lack of constitutional standing, District of Massachusetts Judge Mark Wolf found that federal regulation of the prescription eye drops preempted the state-law fraud claims. Judge Wolf’s thorough analysis is worth a careful read. Continue reading “Federal Preemption Ruling Flushes Another Eye-Drop Class Action”

The Latest on ALI’s Liability Insurance Restatement: Same as it Ever Was

scales of justiceWhen last we addressed the American Law Institute’s (ALI) proposed Restatement, Law of Liability Insurance, we reported that the organization decided at its May annual meeting to table final consideration of the document until 2018. One of the proposal’s chief Reporters, Professor Tom Baker, indicated that he and co-Reporter Kyle Logue would embark on a year-long listening tour and consider what they heard when looking anew at the Restatement draft.

It is quite curious then, considering Professor Baker’s statement as well as ALI’s declaration that the draft needed “another year of work,” that on August 4, the institute released Preliminary Draft No. 4—a mere 10 weeks after tabling Draft No. 3 at its meeting.  Even more remarkable are the fundamental similarities between the draft tabled on May 23 and the one released on August 4.

ALI’s haste in issuing another draft, and the Reporters’ obstinate refusal to address valid criticisms of Draft No. 3, are further evidence of an accelerating mission drift that could cause the legal community to lose respect for organization’s work. Continue reading “The Latest on ALI’s Liability Insurance Restatement: Same as it Ever Was”

D.C. Circuit Once Again Reminds EPA Which Governmental Branch Enacts Laws

Featured Expert Column – Environmental Law and Policy

sboxermanBy Samuel B. Boxerman, Sidley Austin LLP with Katharine Falahee Newman, Sidley Austin LLP

In recent years, either when Congress has chosen not to act on certain matters—or arguably does so without sufficient clarity—the Executive Branch has asserted the power to address issues through regulation. These agency actions, of course, run headlong into one of the core separation of powers under the Constitution—that Congress is empowered to enact laws while the Executive is tasked with implementing them.

Hence, not surprisingly, the judiciary has increasingly been asked to answer whether an agency had the statutory authority to issue a particular regulation—or whether the agency exceeded the power it had been granted by the Congress.

A recent decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit adds to that jurisprudence. On August 8, 2017, a three-judge panel ruled in Mexichem Fluor, Inc. v. EPA that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) exceeded its authority under the Clean Air Act (“CAA” or Act) when it issued a 2015 rule eliminating the use of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in certain products (the “2015 HFC Rule”). Continue reading “D.C. Circuit Once Again Reminds EPA Which Governmental Branch Enacts Laws”

Drunk Suing, Another Round: Court Allows False-Labeling Claim on “Hawaiian Beer” to Proceed

indexWe have been covering a legal action against Kona Brewing Company (now renamed Broomfield v. Craft Brew Alliance), which is one suit in the larger trend of class actions against breweries alleging misleading or false labeling and advertising.  In that suit, Judge Beth Labson Freeman, who sits on the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California (a.k.a. the “Food Court”), recently ruled on Kona’s motion to dismiss.

Though the court trimmed the complaint, dismissing several of the plaintiffs’ causes-of-action and requests for relief, it held that the crux of the allegations could proceed.  The result is that, through strategic pleading, Kona must spend its time and resources fighting a lawsuit with questionable merits.  Judge Freeman created perverse incentives for future litigants by choosing to become, in essence, a product-packaging regulator. Continue reading “Drunk Suing, Another Round: Court Allows False-Labeling Claim on “Hawaiian Beer” to Proceed”