King v. Burwell’s Implications for Employer-Sponsored Health Plans

Guest Commentary

Kim Wilcoxon, Thompson Hine LLP

Three years ago, the Supreme Court of the United States announced its decision in NFIB v. Sebelius and upheld the individual mandate under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Last week, the Supreme Court announced its decision in King v. Burwell and upheld the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) interpretation that tax credits were available under the ACA for taxpayers in all states, whether or not a state’s exchange was established by the state government or the federal.

There are many similarities in how these decisions affect employer-sponsored health plans. It’s déjà vu all over again, so this post revisits questions addressed in this blog three years ago in light of King v. Burwell. Continue reading

Supreme Court Observations: Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor – Intellectual Property (Patents)

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Venable LLP

The U.S. Supreme Court recently decided a closely watched case concerning contract rights and patent royalties. In Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC the Court upheld its long standing precedent and determined that parties cannot agree to patent royalty payments that extend beyond the expiration of the patent.

The case originated when Kimble and Marvel agreed to a patent license for a toy glove that Kimble had patented. The licensing agreement called for a lump sum payment and running royalties for a license to the patent as part of a settlement of ongoing litigation. The agreement did not set an end date for the royalty payments. In making its decision the Court upheld its ruling in Brulotte v. Thys Co., 379 U.S. 29 (1964), holding that licenses requiring payment of patent royalties after patent expiration are “unlawful per se.” Brulotte has been the subject of criticism in the 50 years since it was decided, but the Court determined that was not enough of a reason to overturn its longstanding precedent. Continue reading

Law Professor’s Attack on WLF’s “Legislative Grace Canon” Argument in “King v. Burwell” Brief Sails Wide of the Mark

Not a "canon"

Not a “canon”

University of Iowa College of Law Professor Andy Grewal blogged earlier this year about WLF’s amicus curiae brief in King v. Burwell at the Yale Journal on Regulation’s Notice & Comment Blog. While we’ll refrain from comment on his rather pedantic advice as to what material is best included in a brief, we did want to set the record straight about the crux of WLF’s argument, especially given the decision’s imminent release before the Supreme Court term ends later this month.

In a nutshell, WLF’s brief asks the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse an appeals court ruling that, if upheld, would allow IRS to appropriate billions of dollars a year in tax credits without authorization from Congress. IRS argued that it was entitled to Chevron deference for the agency’s interpretation of § 1321 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which authorizes subsidies for an exchange “established by the State.” Continue reading

Supreme Court Holds that Belief Patent Is Invalid Is No Defense to Induced Infringement

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor – Intellectual Property (Patents)

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Venable LLP

The Supreme Court declined to create a new defense this week for defendants in patent infringement cases, holding that a defendant’s belief regarding patent validity is not a defense to a claim of induced infringement under 35 U.S.C. § 271(b), as a matter of first impression in Commil USA, LLC v. Cisco Systems, Inc. This is welcome news to some patent owners who have felt the legal tide has been turning against them. However, the Court also recognized that so-called “patent trolls” exist and that frivolous patent infringement lawsuits are being brought in federal courts. The Court stressed that district courts have authority under Rule 11 and 35 U.S.C § 285 to levy sanctions and award fees to dissuade frivolous cases from being filed. With its ruling, the Court continued its trend of trying to maintain a balance between patent owners and accused infringers.

The Court began its analysis by clarifying the current state of the law. Direct infringement is a strict liability offense. The state of mind of the infringer is not relevant in determining liability for direct infringement. In contrast to direct infringement, liability for inducing infringement attaches only if the defendant knew of the patent and that “the induced acts constitute patent in­fringement.” Global-Tech Appliances, Inc. v. SEB S.A. It is not enough if the party charged with induced infringement did not know that the acts it induced would infringe. Continue reading

Raisin Farmers’ Video Explains What’s at Stake in Pending “Horne v. USDA” SCOTUS Case

This video explains why Laura and Marvin Horne have taken their case that a U.S. Department of Agriculture marketing program violates the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution all the way to the Supreme Court.

Washington Legal Foundation filed an amicus brief in Horne v. USDA supporting the farmers’ argument that the program’s seizure of raisin crops without compensation is an unconstitutional taking. The Court heard oral arguments in the case on April 22. On the afternoon of the argument, WLF held a Web Seminar program assessing the arguments, which featured one of the Hornes’ attorneys, Stephen Schwartz.  A video of the program can be viewed here.

Supreme Court Agrees to Review Uninjured Plaintiffs’ Lawsuit

supreme courtThe U.S. Supreme Court this morning granted certiorari in Spokeo, Inc. v. Robbins, a case from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit involving an issue that the Court declined to address twice in the past several years: whether Congress can grant citizens the ability to file lawsuits in situations where those plaintiffs could not otherwise satisfy the “case or controversy” requirement of Article III of the U.S. Constitution.

On April 15, a WLF Legal Pulse commentary by WLF Chief Counsel Rich Samp, Supreme Court Has Opportunity to Halt Lawsuits by Uninjured Plaintiffs, explained why the Court should decline the recommendation of the Solicitor General of the U.S., which, at the Court’s invitation, had filed an amicus brief urging the justices to deny review.

Also, soon after the Court sought the views of the Solicitor General, WLF hosted a Web Seminar program on Spokeo and the issue of statutorily-created injury that featured Spokeo‘s Counsel of Record, Andrew Pincus of Mayer Brown LLP, and Meir Feder of Jones Day.

WLF Program to Assess Supreme Court Arguments in Critical Property Rights Case

PodiumPic1Studies have shown a correlation between strong protections for private property ownership and environmental quality. It is quite appropriate, then, that the U.S. Supreme Court will be hearing arguments today, Earth Day 2015, in a critical property rights case, Horne v. U.S. Department of Agriculture. The case involves, among other issues, whether a “categorical” or per se taking of property under the Fifth Amendment occurs when government seizes personal property, rather than real property. The personal property in Horne were raisins, and the seizure occurred under a Depression-era “Raisin Marketing Order.”

Washington Legal Foundation, which filed an amicus brief supporting Marvin and Laura Horne’s takings claim, will be hosting a live Web Seminar program this afternoon at 1:00 p.m. EDT, Takings of Personal Property: An Assessment of U.S. Supreme Court Arguments in Horne v. USDA. Click here for free registration.

Our panelists this afternoon will be:

Timothy S. Bishop, Partner, Mayer Brown LLP
Stephen S. Schwartz, Associate, Kirkland & Ellis LLP
Richard A. Samp, Chief Counsel, Washington Legal Foundation