“Sorrell v. IMS Health” Is Gaining Traction in the Federal Appeals Courts

9thCirSome legal commentators heralded the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2011 decision in Sorrell v. IMS Health, Inc. as a marked expansion of First Amendment protections for commercial speech. Sorrell held that content- or speaker-based restrictions on non-misleading commercial speech regarding lawful goods or services should be subjected to “heightened” judicial scrutiny. But whether Sorrell would have any practical effect on challenges to commercial-speech restrictions was far from clear, particularly because the Court did not explain what it meant by “heightened” scrutiny and because it struck down the speech restrictions at issue under the more relaxed “intermediate scrutiny” standard that it had been applying in commercial-speech cases for more than 30 years. Continue reading

Advisory Committee’s Violations of Federal Law Threaten Credibility of 2015 Dietary Guidelines

MyPlateIn introducing an October 7, 2015 oversight hearing on the forthcoming 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA), House Agriculture Committee Chairman Michael Conaway stated, “It is essential that the guidance that comes out of this process can be trusted by the American people.” Chairman Conaway framed that remark in the context of the scientific evidence the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) relied upon in its Scientific Report. Lawmakers should question the quality of the report’s science, but their probe of the DGAC and its work shouldn’t stop there. Another, perhaps greater, threat to the Dietary Guidelines’ credibility is the significant breaches of federal law that occurred in the creation of the DGAC. Violations of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) infect the entire Scientific Report and call into question its recommendations and any federal regulatory proposals that rely on the report or the resulting DGA. Continue reading

Update: San Francisco Supervisors Repeal “Sugary-Drink” Ad Ban on City Property

sanfranA September 11, 2015 WLF Legal Pulse post, San Francisco’s Sweetened-Beverage Warning Mandate and Ad Ban Tread on First Amendment, discussed the serious constitutional infirmities of two advertising-restriction ordinances adopted in the City by the Bay. One ordinance imposed an immediate sweeping ban on ads for soda and other “sugary drinks” on city property; the other requires that warnings be included on billboards and other media that promoted those products by July 2016.

The American Beverage Association (ABA) filed a First Amendment challenge to both ordinances, as well as a preliminary injunction requesting that the court put the city-property ad ban on hold. On August 25, the city asked the court to enter a stipulation and order stating that San Francisco agreed not to enforce the speech ban while ABA’s suit was pending.

On December 1, the Board of Supervisors repealed the advertising ban. The Board did not repeal the warning requirement, and ABA’s constitutional challenge of that ordinance remains pending in federal court. Supervisor Malia Cohen, who sponsored the now-repealed ad ban, sought to mitigate this acquiescence to constitutional reality at the meeting by remarking, “I want to assure you that the war rages on.”

Court Decision on Berkeley Cell-Phone Warning Undermines Protections Against Compelled Speech

Berkeley once marched for free speech

Berkeley once marched for free speech

No one seriously disputes that the government is entitled to adopt broadly applicable laws that require a product seller to disclose truthful information about its product so that consumers can know what they are buying. But governments with increasing frequency have been requiring sellers to convey information that cannot plausibly be deemed the sort of truthful, noncontroversial information that consumers expect to see on product labeling.

Unfortunately, recent decisions suggest that at least some courts are unwilling to protect the First Amendment right of product sellers not to be forced to communicate controversial government messages that they do not wish to convey. Such rulings undermine constitutional protections against compelled government speech that the Supreme Court has consistently recognized for the past 75 years. Continue reading

FCC Should Not Remain Silent on Berkeley’s Junk-Science Wireless Warnings

harold_frRothGuest Commentary

By Harold Furchtgott-Roth and Arielle Roth, The Hudson Institute*

In a victory for pseudo-science and a loss for the First Amendment, federal judge Edward Chen recently upheld a regulation by the City of Berkeley compelling retailers to warn customers about the supposed risks of wireless radiation. CTIA-The Wireless Ass’n v. The City of Berkeley.

The ordinance requires that cell phone retailers inform customers of the following:

To assure safety, the Federal Government requires that cell phones meet radio frequency (RF) exposure guidelines.

The statement misleadingly suggests that the federal government has singled out cell phones for safety concerns. This is not the case. The FCC’s guidelines on RF exposure (including these in 2013 and these in 2003) apply to a wide range of devices, not just cell phones. Nor has it been shown that in the absence of FCC regulations, cell phones would be unsafe. The FCC, which takes safety very seriously, has never concluded anything of the sort. Continue reading

FDA’s Latest Regulatory Salvo at “Added Sugars” Ignores Federal Laws, Due Process, Part II

FDAThis is the second part of a two-part commentary on FDA’s requirements that added sugars be listed on the food Nutrition Facts panel, and that a Daily Reference Value (DRV) be set for added sugars and included in the panel footnote. For part I, click here.

 FDA’s Reliance Solely on a DGAC Report to Establish a DRV is Unprecedented

When implementing the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act, FDA first set daily reference values in 1993 based on “sufficient scientific consensus,” a standard established by the agency under that law. FDA did not rely on a federal advisory committee’s report. Moreover, it relied only minimally on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans itself. Instead, FDA cited numerous consensus reports which, taken together, constituted “sufficient scientific consensus.” Continue reading

FDA’s Latest Regulatory Salvo at “Added Sugars” Ignores Federal Laws, Due Process, Part I

FDAAs we discussed in an August 11 post, a “supplementary proposed rule” from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has taken the federal government’s contrived campaign against “added sugars” to a new level. FDA not only cites a federal advisory committee’s report as retroactive justification for added-sugars disclosure on food labels, it also seeks to establish a Daily Reference Value (DRV) for added sugars. The DRV would be used to calculate a “%DV” that would appear in addition to the grams of added sugars on the Nutrition Facts label. Finally, FDA released results of a consumer survey, completed after its initial added-sugars labeling proposal in March 2014, in support of the Nutrition Facts mandate. The public comment period for these items ends on October 13.

In this two-part commentary, we discuss some of the federal statutory and administrative procedural problems with the supplementary proposed rule. These legal infirmities, which stakeholders will likely raise in their public comments, could expose the agency to court challenges. Continue reading