Bureau of Land Management Proposes Rule on Oil/Gas Production on Federal Land

sboxermanFeatured Expert Column – Environmental Law and Policy

by Samuel B. Boxerman, Sidley Austin LLP
with Ben Tannen, Sidley Austin LLP

On January 22, 2016, the U.S. Department of Interior’s (“DOI”) Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”) issued a proposed rule governing oil and natural gas production on onshore Federal and Tribal lands. Bureau of Land Management, Pre-Publication Proposed Rule, Waste Prevention, Production Subject to Royalties, and Resource Conservation (Jan. 22, 2016) (“Proposed Rule”). Coming on the heels of U.S. EPA’s proposed regulation of emissions from certain new and modified oil and gas sources, the BLM proposal represents a further expansion of the federal government’s regulation of the oil and gas business.   Continue reading

High Court’s Cert Denial Should Put an End to Novel Anti-Preemption Claim in Medical-Device Suits

ReedGuest Commentary

by Matthew A. Reed, Sedgwick LLP

When plaintiffs bring state tort causes of action against the manufacturers of medical devices that have passed the Food and Drug Administration’s (“FDA”) rigorous pre-market approval (“PMA”) process, they enter a realm highly regulated by the federal government, and thus face a daunting task to avoid dismissal of their claims. They must demonstrate that their state-law claims require nothing more or different of the manufacturer than what the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”) already requires, or else their claims are not “parallel” and thus expressly preempted by § 360k of the Medical Device Amendments (“MDA”) to the FDCA. But they also must show that their claims are based on state law distinct from the FDCA, because claims predicated on the FDCA are impliedly preempted as private attempts to enforce federal law. Continue reading

Imperfect Pleading v. Limits on Invalidation Authority: Federal Circuit Attempts to Clarify the Scope of Judicial Review

Wright_print_highres2Pelletier_Print HiResGuest Commentary

By Jon E. Wright & Pauline M. Pelletier, Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox*

A hot topic in post-grant proceedings before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) is whether determinations made by the PTAB at the institution stage are reviewable on appeal by the Federal Circuit. In SightSound Techs., LLC v. Apple Inc., 2015 WL 8770164 (Fed. Cir. Dec. 15, 2015), the Federal Circuit held that it lacked jurisdiction to review the PTAB’s decision to consider issues not raised in the petition, but confirmed that it did have jurisdiction to review whether a patent was eligible for covered business method (CBM) review. The difference between these two issues, it noted, is that the petition could be “cured by a proper pleading” whereas CBM review eligibility constitutes a limit “on the Board’s authority to issue a final decision.” Continue reading

New Federal Procedural Rules May Deter Filing of Baseless Patent Lawsuits

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor – Intellectual Property (Patents)

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Venable LLP

For years, defendants in patent infringement cases have protested the ease with which patent plaintiffs could file complaints. Since 1938, Form 18—a model form in an appendix of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP)—set the pleading standard that courts in patent cases have applied. Form 18 requires that the complaint merely state that the plaintiff owns the patent(s), that the defendant infringes the patent(s), and that the plaintiff suffered damages. The form is barely over a page long and does not require any information on how the defendant infringes the patent or even what patent claims are allegedly infringed. Continue reading

DirecTV Inc. v. Imburgia: The Supreme Court’s Latest Word on Arbitration and Federal Preemption

Cruz-Alvarez_FFeatured Expert Contributor – Civil Justice/Class Actions

By Frank Cruz-Alvarez, Shook, Hardy & Bacon L.L.P. (co-authored with Rachel A. Canfield, an associate with the firm)

Last week, in a 6-3 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed and remanded a California Court of Appeal’s interpretation of and refusal to enforce an arbitration agreement.  Justice Breyer delivered the Court’s well-reasoned opinion, which concluded that the California court’s arbitration-specific interpretation of contractual language was preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”). DirecTV Inc. v. Imburgia, et al.

Petitioner DirecTV entered into service agreements with certain customers. Although governed by the FAA, the agreement’s arbitration provision contained a class-action waiver which rendered the entire provision unenforceable if the waiver clause was deemed unenforceable under the law of the customer’s state.  Seeking damages for early termination fees that allegedly violated California law, respondents Amy Imburgia and Kathy Greiner filed suit against DirecTV in California state court.   Continue reading

U.S. v. Clay: A Federal White Collar Criminal Case to Keep an Eye On

matt_kaiser300Guest Commentary

Matthew G. Kaiser, Partner, Kaiser, LeGrand & Dillon PLLC

A court case that should be on the radar screen of all business executives and white-collar criminal-defense attorneys in 2016 is United States v. Clay, in which the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit heard oral argument on October 2.

The case, about which I authored a Washington Legal Foundation Legal Backgrounder last March, implicates the fundamental question of who decides the meaning of a law—a judge or a jury? The Eleventh Circuit will also implicitly decide whether the government can cast aside more appropriate civil or administrative remedies and prosecute corporate officers operating a business in a complex regulatory environment when their interpretation of a law is objectively reasonable. Continue reading

FTC Takes Scissors to Staples/Office Depot Merger

amurinoFeatured Expert Column – Antitrust/Federal Trade Commission

Andrea Agathoklis Murino, Goodwin Proctor LLP

On December 7, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission voted 4-0 to file suit against Staples Inc.’s acquisition of Office Depot, Inc. (“OD”), finding that it would combine the number one and number two market participants and therefore lead to an anticompetitive reduction in nationwide competition in the market for consumable office supplies sold to large business customers. This vote surprised many observers as it came just two years after the FTC cleared Office Depot’s acquisition of Office Max (“OM”), which combined the then number two and number three participants.

To this observer, the decision to block was, however, not a surprise. In looking at recent FTC enforcement actions, especially the Sysco/US Foods challenge, and in closely examining the bases on which the OD/OM transaction was cleared, several key differences emerged that are almost certainly what led to such wildly divergent enforcement outcomes. Continue reading