WLF Program to Assess Supreme Court Arguments in Critical Property Rights Case

PodiumPic1Studies have shown a correlation between strong protections for private property ownership and environmental quality. It is quite appropriate, then, that the U.S. Supreme Court will be hearing arguments today, Earth Day 2015, in a critical property rights case, Horne v. U.S. Department of Agriculture. The case involves, among other issues, whether a “categorical” or per se taking of property under the Fifth Amendment occurs when government seizes personal property, rather than real property. The personal property in Horne were raisins, and the seizure occurred under a Depression-era “Raisin Marketing Order.”

Washington Legal Foundation, which filed an amicus brief supporting Marvin and Laura Horne’s takings claim, will be hosting a live Web Seminar program this afternoon at 1:00 p.m. EDT, Takings of Personal Property: An Assessment of U.S. Supreme Court Arguments in Horne v. USDA. Click here for free registration.

Our panelists this afternoon will be:

Timothy S. Bishop, Partner, Mayer Brown LLP
Stephen S. Schwartz, Associate, Kirkland & Ellis LLP
Richard A. Samp, Chief Counsel, Washington Legal Foundation

WLF Attorney Interviewed for FCPA Compliance and Ethics Report Blog Podcast

Attorney Thomas R. Fox, a prominent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) practitioner and author of a forthcoming WLF Legal Opinion Letter, “Is SEC Heading toward a Strict Liability Application of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act?,” recently interviewed WLF Legal Studies Division Chief Counsel, Glenn Lammi, about WLF’s public interest work and our focus on the FCPA.

 Episode 151-Glenn Lammi, Washington Legal Foundation.

End of the Road in the Long-running “FTC v. Phoebe Putney” Saga

amurinoFeatured Expert Column – Antitrust/Federal Trade Commission

Andrea Agathoklis Murino, Goodwin Proctor LLP

Many months ago, I wrote about the ongoing saga that was the Federal Trade Commission’s (“FTC”) attempt to unwind the acquisition of Palmyra Park Hospital (“Palmyra”) by Phoebe Putney Health System Inc. (“Phoebe”) in Albany, Georgia. There were visits to all three levels of the federal court system (yes, even the Supremes!), as well as unexpected detours through various Georgia regulatory bodies. With the FTC’s announcement late last month that it was settling its administrative litigation with a behavioral remedy, we now know how this story ends.

Where We’ve Been

This journey began back in early-2011 with the FTC’s attempt to block the deal outright on the grounds that the combined entity would have had market shares in excess of 85% in the provision of acute care services in a six-county region. The FTC initially secured a preliminary injunction at the district court level but Phoebe successfully argued that despite the concentration levels, its acquisition was legal under the state action doctrine. The state action doctrine provides that where (1) there is a clearly articulated state policy to displace competition and (2) there is active supervision by the state of the policy or activity, otherwise anticompetitive activity will be permitted. Here, Phoebe argued the acquisition was immune under both prongs of the test because it was owned by the Hospital Authority of Albany-Dougherty County, and operated under Georgia’s Hospital Authorities Law.

Continue reading

Playing Field May Continue to Shift for Patent Litigants on Willful Infringement

Kaminski_Jeffri_LRFeatured Expert Contributor–Intellectual Property (Patents)

Jeffri A. Kaminski, Venable LLP

While various patent reform proposals percolate on Capitol Hill, the courts continue to decide cases that impact the issues. A recent U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit decision in Halo Electronics, Inc. v. Pulse Electronics, Inc. maintains the current standard for enhanced damages for willful infringement (a victory for accused infringers), but signals that a change may be coming (a victory for patent owners). Currently, a patent owner must prove that an infringer willfully infringes by clear and convincing evidence in order to recover enhanced damages. Under 35 U.S.C. § 284, enhanced damages may be up to three times the damages found.

In Halo Electronics, the Federal Circuit passed on an opportunity to change, and perhaps lower, the standard required for proving willful infringement, similar to how the Supreme Court lowered the standard for fee-shifting in Octane Fitness (see our previous post on fee-shifting). Although the court passed on the opportunity this time, four of the seven Federal Circuit judges are now on record as favoring reconsideration of the standard for enhanced damages for willful infringement. Continue reading

Five Highlights Surrounding New Rules for Hydraulic Fracturing on Federal Lands

sboxermanFeatured Expert Column – Environmental Law and Policy

by Samuel B. Boxerman, Sidley Austin LLP, with Katharine Newman, Sidley Austin LLP

On March 20, 2015, the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) released a final rule regulating hydraulic fracturing on federal land managed by BLM and the U.S. Forest Service, as well as on Native American tribal lands. The rule is the first from the federal government to specifically address hydraulic fracturing on federal lands.

For BLM, the final rule completes a process the agency began in 2010 to update well-drilling regulations in response to technological advances in high volume hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling that now dominate domestic oil and gas operations. BLM reports that there are over 100,000 oil and gas wells under federal management and that at least ninety percent of these wells use hydraulic fracturing technology. The new rule will not, however, govern wells on private and state land that are regulated by state agencies and account for the vast majority of oil and gas development in the United States.

Below are five key highlights related to the final rule: Continue reading

Supreme Court’s “Omnicare” Decision Follows Middle Path Advocated by Lane Powell and WLF

greeneddavisjGuest Commentary

By Douglas W. Greene and Claire Loebs Davis, Shareholders with Lane Powell PC in Seattle, Washington. They co-authored WLF’s amicus brief pro bono in Omnicare.

In the opinion issued on March 24 in Omnicare, Inc. v. Laborers District Council Construction Industry Pension Fund (“Omnicare”), the Supreme Court rejected the two extremes advocated by the parties regarding how the truth or falsity of statements of opinion should be considered under the securities laws. Instead, it adopted the middle path advocated in the amicus brief filed by Lane Powell on behalf of Washington Legal Foundation (“WLF”).

In doing so, the Court also laid out a blueprint for examining claims of falsity under the securities laws, which we believe will do for falsity analysis what Tellabs, Inc. v. Makor Issues & Rights, Ltd., 551 U.S. 308 (2007), did for scienter analysis. Hence, Omnicare will help defense counsel defeat claims that opinions were false or misleading in § 11 cases, as well as in cases brought under § 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act. Continue reading

Update: Illinois Supreme Court Rejects Plaintiffs’ Lawyer’s Request to Remove Justice from $11 Billion Case

Ill. S CtOn March 4 in “By Treating Recusal Motions as a Game, Lawyers are Eroding Public Confidence in our Courts,” Washington Legal Foundation’s Chief Counsel Rich Samp wrote about the corrosive effect of plaintiffs’ lawyers’ demands that unfriendly judges be recused from hearing their cases. Much of the commentary centered around the multiple motions plaintiffs’ lawyers in a case called Price v. Philip Morris filed to recuse Illinois Supreme Court Justice Lloyd A. Karmeier from participating in the lawyers’ request to re-open that court’s 2005 decision.

As reported yesterday in Legal Newsline, the state high court denied the most recent request to disqualify Justice Karmeier from the Price case on March 11. The Court has yet to rule on the request to re-open the case.