Five Highlights Surrounding New Rules for Hydraulic Fracturing on Federal Lands

sboxermanFeatured Expert Column – Environmental Law and Policy

by Samuel B. Boxerman, Sidley Austin LLP, with Katharine Newman, Sidley Austin LLP

On March 20, 2015, the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) released a final rule regulating hydraulic fracturing on federal land managed by BLM and the U.S. Forest Service, as well as on Native American tribal lands. The rule is the first from the federal government to specifically address hydraulic fracturing on federal lands.

For BLM, the final rule completes a process the agency began in 2010 to update well-drilling regulations in response to technological advances in high volume hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling that now dominate domestic oil and gas operations. BLM reports that there are over 100,000 oil and gas wells under federal management and that at least ninety percent of these wells use hydraulic fracturing technology. The new rule will not, however, govern wells on private and state land that are regulated by state agencies and account for the vast majority of oil and gas development in the United States.

Below are five key highlights related to the final rule: Continue reading

Supreme Court’s “Omnicare” Decision Follows Middle Path Advocated by Lane Powell and WLF

greeneddavisjGuest Commentary

By Douglas W. Greene and Claire Loebs Davis, Shareholders with Lane Powell PC in Seattle, Washington. They co-authored WLF’s amicus brief pro bono in Omnicare.

In the opinion issued on March 24 in Omnicare, Inc. v. Laborers District Council Construction Industry Pension Fund (“Omnicare”), the Supreme Court rejected the two extremes advocated by the parties regarding how the truth or falsity of statements of opinion should be considered under the securities laws. Instead, it adopted the middle path advocated in the amicus brief filed by Lane Powell on behalf of Washington Legal Foundation (“WLF”).

In doing so, the Court also laid out a blueprint for examining claims of falsity under the securities laws, which we believe will do for falsity analysis what Tellabs, Inc. v. Makor Issues & Rights, Ltd., 551 U.S. 308 (2007), did for scienter analysis. Hence, Omnicare will help defense counsel defeat claims that opinions were false or misleading in § 11 cases, as well as in cases brought under § 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act. Continue reading

Update: Illinois Supreme Court Rejects Plaintiffs’ Lawyer’s Request to Remove Justice from $11 Billion Case

Ill. S CtOn March 4 in “By Treating Recusal Motions as a Game, Lawyers are Eroding Public Confidence in our Courts,” Washington Legal Foundation’s Chief Counsel Rich Samp wrote about the corrosive effect of plaintiffs’ lawyers’ demands that unfriendly judges be recused from hearing their cases. Much of the commentary centered around the multiple motions plaintiffs’ lawyers in a case called Price v. Philip Morris filed to recuse Illinois Supreme Court Justice Lloyd A. Karmeier from participating in the lawyers’ request to re-open that court’s 2005 decision.

As reported yesterday in Legal Newsline, the state high court denied the most recent request to disqualify Justice Karmeier from the Price case on March 11. The Court has yet to rule on the request to re-open the case.

WLF Web Seminar Explores New General Personal Jurisdiction Arguments under SCOTUS’s “Bauman” Ruling

Litigating away from “Home”: General Personal Jurisdiction One Year after the Supreme Court’s Daimler AG v. Bauman Decision

Mr. Beck utilized a PowerPoint slide presentation. The archive of the program, which includes a viewable version of the slides, is available at WLF’s website here.  If you would prefer to watch the video above, a PDF of the slides are available here.

Related materials on Daimler AG v. Bauman and its application in civil litigation:

Ohio Supreme Court Holds Municipal “Fracking” Regulations Cannot Conflict with State Rules

sboxermanFeatured Expert Column – Environmental Law and Policy

by Samuel B. Boxerman, Sidley Austin LLP, with Katharine Newman, Sidley Austin LLP

Last week, the Ohio Supreme Court weighed in on the battle being waged between state and local governments over oil and gas development, ruling that Ohio cities and municipalities may not use home rule to regulate oil and gas operations if local regulations directly conflict with Ohio state law. The decision represents a significant victory for the oil and gas industry and is likely to serve as important precedent in disputes raising similar issues in other states.

In State ex rel. Morrison v. Beck Energy Corp., the court ruled 4-3 that Munroe Falls’ ordinances, enacted between 1980 and 1995, were in direct conflict with Ohio’s 2004 law, R.C. 1509, which provides statewide, uniform regulation of oil and gas operations. R.C. 1509 preserves local regulation over public spaces and permit authority for heavy traffic, but expressly prohibits a local government from using its powers to impede or obstruct oil and gas activity. Continue reading

Five Lessons: Ninth Circuit Upholds Decision to Block Idaho Healthcare Merger

amurinoFeatured Expert Column – Antitrust/Federal Trade Commission

Andrea Agathoklis Murino, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati*

On February 10, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit affirmed a lower court ruling blocking the merger of St. Luke’s Health Systems, Ltd. (St. Luke’s) and Saltzer Medical Group (Saltzer), and handed the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) yet another victory in its efforts to halt consolidation in the healthcare sector.  This opinion is instructive both because of what it reveals on the macro-level about merger review today, and for what it may portend in future healthcare consolidation cases. Continue reading

New Jersey High Court Confirms Proper Test for Defining “Independent Contractor”

body_TabakmanMEGuest Commentary

by Mark E. Tabakman, Fox Rothschild LLP

A November 2014 I authored for Washington Legal Foundation, New Jersey Supreme Court Set to Rule on Definition of “Independent Contractor”, analyzed questions that had been certified to the New Jersey Supreme Court on whether an individual was an independent contractor under New Jersey wage-hour laws. My reading of the tea leaves was that the Court would adopt the test already engrafted into the New Jersey Unemployment Law. That is in fact what the Court did.

On January 14, 2015, the Court in Hargrove v Sleepy’s, LLC (“Hargrove”) (Dkt. No. A-70-12) resolved the issue of when an individual may be properly classified as an independent contractor under the New Jersey Wage Payment Act (“WPA”) and the New Jersey Wage Hour Law (“WHL”) and held that the “ABC” test governs. Under the ABC test, services performed by an individual are deemed to be employment unless the following is shown:

(a) that the individual has been and will continue to be free from control…;

(b) that the services provided are either outside the usual course of business…or performed outside of all the places of business of the enterprise…; and,

(c) that the individual is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession, or business.

The Court noted that both of New Jersey’s wage and hour laws neither defined “employee” or “independent contractor” nor set forth the standards to be utilized in such analyses. The Court then examined the plain language of the laws and the implementing regulations of both laws, and concluded that deference should be given to the position of the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (“NJDOL”), as it was the Agency charged with interpreting and enforcing these laws. On that basis, the Court concluded that the same test, under both laws, should be utilized to determine whether or not an employment relationship existed.

In holding that the ABC test governs, the Court rejected the common law “right to control” test and the “economic realities” test because the “right to control” test, as the Court noted, is incompatible with the legislature’s goal of ensuring economic security and the “economic realities” test, as the Court noted, could lead to inconsistent results.

By requiring that each element be satisfied, the ABC test (which NJDOL supports and utilizes) facilitated, as the Court explained, “greater income security” for workers—the underlying purpose of both laws at issue. The ABC test presumes that an employment relationship exists and places the burden on the employer to prove differently. The last prong (i.e. independently established business), is where the issue is joined most of the time and where (often) most of the cases flounder for the putative employer. Accordingly, the Hargrove decision has decidedly and emphatically increased the coverage and protection of New Jersey’s wage and hour laws in favor of “employees.”

Businesses in New Jersey that presently utilize or are considering use of independent contractors would be well advised to work with experienced employment counsel to ensure compliance with the Court’s holding.