Update: U.S. Government Fails to Answer Argentina’s Call for Help, Declines Filing Brief in Sovereign Debt Case

DOJArgentina this week received some support (in the form of several amicus curiae briefs) for its efforts to obtain Supreme Court review of the setback it suffered in Second Circuit at the hands of Argentine bondholders. Argentina needs all the help it can get; it is nearing the end of the line in its thus-far unsuccessful efforts to ignore the claims of “holdout” bondholders. However, the most important news from the Court this week was who did not file: the United States government declined entreaties by Argentina to urge the High Court to review the case. Without the support of the United States, Argentina has little hope of convincing the Supreme Court to hear its appeal.

The holdouts will file their brief in May, and the Justices will convene in early June to decide whether to hear the case. If, as is likely, they decide not to hear it, that will be the end of the line for Argentina in U.S. courts on this issue.

Among the briefs filed this week, one that stands out is the brief filed by Brazil. Its principal argument was that the injunction issued against Argentina—requiring Argentina to treat all its bondholders equally—“offends the sovereignty and dignity of Brazil.” It is hard to understand how that is so, unless Brazil wants to join Argentina in refusing to pay its bondholders. Moreover, Brazil seems to overlook that the Second Circuit did not order Argentina to pay anything. The court’s injunction merely said, in effect, “You are a sovereign nation and cannot be forced to use your non-commercial assets to repay your debts. But you can’t have it both ways; if you refuse to make any payments to creditors whose claims have been upheld by our courts, you cannot expect to be granted easy access to American equity markets.” Brazil need not worry that it too will be denied access to equity markets so long as it abides by its contractual commitments to treat all bondholders fairly.

Like all of the other amicus briefs filed this week, Brazil’s fails to cite a single U.S. court decision that conflicts with the Second Circuit decision. In the absence of such a conflict, the U.S. Supreme Court is likely to deny review. Indeed, of the many thousands of petitions it receives each year, it agrees to hear on average only 70. Nor is the Court usually impressed by the sheer number of amicus curiae briefs (ten were filed in support of Argentina); it is identity of the filer (e.g., briefs submitted by the United States carry significant weight) rather than quantity of filings that the Justices focus on most closely. For example, the Court is unlikely to give much weight to Brazil’s brief, in light of press reports suggesting that Brazil decided to file only after demanding and receiving trade concessions from Argentina (as discussed here at The Legal Pulse). The Court takes a dim view of amicus briefs that are, in effect, paid for by one of the parties.

One thought on “Update: U.S. Government Fails to Answer Argentina’s Call for Help, Declines Filing Brief in Sovereign Debt Case

  1. Pingback: Update: Former Attorney General of the U.S. and Fellow Former Federal Judges Urge SCOTUS to Deny Review in Argentine Debt Case | The Legal Pulse

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